1.24.2007

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 271_273



January 24, 1807

A week later, Clay found satisfactory proof to convince himself and the Administration that Burr was in fact guilty and two of his men had been arrested and transported to Washington with charges against the U.S. government. Dr. Justus Erick Bollman and Mr. Samuel Swartwout, Burr’s agents in the city of Orleans, arrived in Washington, where they applied for Habeas Corpus but had not at the time of the letter to Thomas Todd yet been presented in front of a court. Clay stated that “what disposition will be made of them remains to be decided.”
In the same letter, he informed Todd of the auspicious resolution with Great Britain for which he anticipated the most favorable results. As for the affairs with Spain, they “still continued in the dark”, but war did not seem to be a necessary event for the moment.
In closing the letter, Clay commented on his horse Buzzard and the success it was having over Continent and Dragon.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 271_273

1.16.2007

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 269­_271



January 16, 1807

In a letter to Harry Innes, the first United States federal Judge in Kentucky, Henry Clay righteously charged Mr. Innes of impeachment in corrupt behavior to the U.S. Government and for omission of communication and facts to the same on Spanish affairs. As other “gentlemen”, however, found him not guilty, the charges were dropped with a promise for investigation on Innes. Just a few months before the Innes’ case, another Kentucky Judge, Benjamin Sebastian, had resigned as a consequence of investigation after he received pension benefit from the Spanish Government. In a moment of turmoil, caused by Col. Aaron Burr, military man of the Revolutionary war, Clay had to move away from Innes’ case to solve more imminent foreign affairs.
Col. Burr seemed indeed to have began treasonable projects against U.S. Government including the reduction of New Orleans, the subjugation of Mexico and the separation of the Western from the Eastern section of the Union. As a consequence New Orleans was put in the maximum state of defense and new measures of investigation on Spanish affairs established to secure more satisfactory intelligence report.
As for the affair with Great Britain, Clay confirmed that they were favorable as U.S. Attorney General William Pinkney was send to join James Monroe in London for the purpose of settling differences with the British government and of negotiating a commercial treaty.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 269­_271