2.01.2007

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 273-276



February 1, 1807

After the arrest and trial for treason of Dr. Bollman and Mr. Swartwout, Clay continued his personal campaign of informing the most significant figures of the Union of Burr’s attempt to divide the country. In a letter to Col. Thomas Hart, militia officer from Hanover County, Virginia, Clay describes his fears for the Union and the dispute over New Orleans and Mexico. If earlier, Clay thought that Mr. Burr was an innocent man, along with many other representatives in the Union, he now faced the reality that Burr had all along plotted against the Union and the country. Now more than ever, the Union was at risk.
Fearing for the European situation with Britain and Spain, Clay described the situation as very unfavorable to the negotiation and the differences between the European countries and the U.S. were too great.
The war that Bonaparte was conducting in Europe, had by this date favored the French dictator, who now controlled the Prussian monarchy as well as many other countries in a rather weak Europe. Clay commented “death alone can check the career of this modern conqueror”.
In closing his entry, Clay was positive that Kentucky had finally proven sympathy and approval to the Union, and even though some were dubious of this fidelity, he told them “he would answer with his honor and life for the attachment to the common cause”.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 273-276