6.18.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 346-348



June 18, 1808

In a different occasion, Henry Clay adopted the name of Scaevola, another consul of the Roman Empire, known for following his father footsteps and becoming praetor, tibune and governor of Sicily.
Scaevola (Henry Clay) accuses Dr. Hunn of using ignorant words and coarse billingsgate, lie and devilment that offend the most illiterate. Scaevola invites Regulus to ignore Dr. Hunn’s response to his previous entry and to disregard the criticism. Scaevola, before closing, offers an anecdote of the same.
One night riding home from Danville, he and his friend Street argued about each other’s success. A pistol was fired and Street’s horse ran away. Dr. Hunn found shelter in a neighboring house. His hat was perforated by two bullet holes, but his had was just fine. Scaevola decides not to comment the happening and to leave the judgment of the situation open to the public.
Clay later used Regulus again to respond to a certain “Farmer” about previous accusations and the reason why he had to use a secret name to cover his identity.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 346-348

6.07.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 335_343



June 7, 1808

In a reply to Clay’s “Regulus”, Dr. Anthony Hunn begins by describing the two types of citizen that make the United States. The first kind is the men who believe or affect to believe that the great public mass is a “mob, a rabble, a swinish multitude, who mush be governed by gentlemen of a certain qualification”. The other division is represented by citizens, who are convinced “by reason and experience” that no men or set of men are “better judges of the national interests of a people than the people themselves”, and therefore there is no higher degree of political wisdom than the voice of the people”. Any citizen with common sense and common education may be acquainted with the science of government. The main difference between the two lies in the fact that the first division wants to command and impose their beliefs on a community, ending with conspiracy and birth of traitors, thus the creation of Spanish conspirators in Kentucky.
Dr. Hunn openly accuses Clay to have favored Burr in an initial instance and later excused himself in a paper insertion in Kentucky. But a public apology is not enough when both Clay and Allen were well acquainted with Burr’s schemes and became “well wishers to his horrid schemes”.
Dr. Hunn closes up, inviting citizens to believe that the Federalist will not contend against the election of Mr. Allen, but the Republicans strive against the machinations of Federalists and Burrites in order to perpetuate the horrors of British lawyer-craft and to crush the development of the Spanish conspiracy.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 335_343

5.31.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 328_335



May 31, 1808

During his lifetime, Henry Clay adopted few pen names that he used to publicly express his ideas in the newspaper. One of the names he assumed was Regulus, after Marcus Atilius Regulus, a Roman consul of the third century B.C.E. In a letter from “Regulus” to the People, Clay describes his fears for the upcoming election of Chief Magistrate for the Commonwealth of Kentucky in a time of public affairs instability. As the foreign wars with Spain and England seem to be nearby, Clay calls for unity and fairness in making a decision for the best interest of the people.
Openly confronting Burr and his supporters, who helped him plan the “Spanish Conspiracy” and defended him against the charges for treason, Clay pushes the people toward a united nation that moves independent from foreign industry and moves away from Federalist beliefs.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 328_335

2.17.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 320-21



February 17, 1808

In a speech at the Eagle tavern in Frankfort Kentucky, Clay announced that Jefferson had previously declined his nomination for the Presidential Chair. In an effort to persuade his Kentucky citizens, Clay suggests the nomination of James Madison, who, like Jefferson, bestowed the same leadership quality. His patriotism, his integrity, his superior talents, his uniform adherence to liberty, and his knowledge are according to Clay the qualities to look for in the new candidate.
James Madison (March 16, 1751 – June 28, 1836) was born and grew up in Virginia, studied classical languages, rhetoric and political studies in Princeton University. He became U.S. fourth President.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 320-21

2.03.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 320



February 3, 1808

The preceding year, the general assembly had ordered to examine the conduct of Benjamin Sebastian to be transmitted to the U.S. President, senators and representatives of Congress. On this day, Congress motioned to call for impeachment of Judge Innes, based on the case of Benjamin Sebastian the preceding year. He was called for an investigation without accusation, but later exonerated.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 320