6.18.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 346-348



June 18, 1808

In a different occasion, Henry Clay adopted the name of Scaevola, another consul of the Roman Empire, known for following his father footsteps and becoming praetor, tibune and governor of Sicily.
Scaevola (Henry Clay) accuses Dr. Hunn of using ignorant words and coarse billingsgate, lie and devilment that offend the most illiterate. Scaevola invites Regulus to ignore Dr. Hunn’s response to his previous entry and to disregard the criticism. Scaevola, before closing, offers an anecdote of the same.
One night riding home from Danville, he and his friend Street argued about each other’s success. A pistol was fired and Street’s horse ran away. Dr. Hunn found shelter in a neighboring house. His hat was perforated by two bullet holes, but his had was just fine. Scaevola decides not to comment the happening and to leave the judgment of the situation open to the public.
Clay later used Regulus again to respond to a certain “Farmer” about previous accusations and the reason why he had to use a secret name to cover his identity.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 346-348

6.07.2008

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 335_343



June 7, 1808

In a reply to Clay’s “Regulus”, Dr. Anthony Hunn begins by describing the two types of citizen that make the United States. The first kind is the men who believe or affect to believe that the great public mass is a “mob, a rabble, a swinish multitude, who mush be governed by gentlemen of a certain qualification”. The other division is represented by citizens, who are convinced “by reason and experience” that no men or set of men are “better judges of the national interests of a people than the people themselves”, and therefore there is no higher degree of political wisdom than the voice of the people”. Any citizen with common sense and common education may be acquainted with the science of government. The main difference between the two lies in the fact that the first division wants to command and impose their beliefs on a community, ending with conspiracy and birth of traitors, thus the creation of Spanish conspirators in Kentucky.
Dr. Hunn openly accuses Clay to have favored Burr in an initial instance and later excused himself in a paper insertion in Kentucky. But a public apology is not enough when both Clay and Allen were well acquainted with Burr’s schemes and became “well wishers to his horrid schemes”.
Dr. Hunn closes up, inviting citizens to believe that the Federalist will not contend against the election of Mr. Allen, but the Republicans strive against the machinations of Federalists and Burrites in order to perpetuate the horrors of British lawyer-craft and to crush the development of the Spanish conspiracy.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 335_343