2.22.2010

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 448-452



February 22, 1810

In an effort to continue his campaign to move away from British dependence, Henry Clay addressed in a letter to the U.S. President his concerns about the upcoming war with Great Britain.
Insisting in several instances that he is the first one to be contrary to war, Clay believes that in order to be free from the British dominion, the United States needs to consider a war with the Royal Crown of England. In his long letter to the President, Clay established the strengths of North American, both agriculturally and industrially, confirming that its dependence on Europe is unnecessary. However, the reliance of Europe, and in particular Great Britain, on North America is crucially essential for their economic survival.
In considering the dominion of Great Britain, Clay referred to the power of the ocean and the militaristic power of the British navy, being the only obstacle between the United States present vulnerability and future universal supremacy.
Responding to the bill on non-intercourse, Clay proposed his view on the matter and for a reconsideration of the act, in regards to the growing militaristic, economic and social assets of the new American nation.

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 448-452