5.31.2010

The Papers of Henry Clay, Pg. 473



May 31, 1810

Clay informs Adam Beatty that he is no longer a candidate for the Senate. In a previous letter to Caesar A. Rodney (472), Clay claims that this decision is chiefly upon the advice of Rodney and his friend Burwell. Clay also contemplates serving out the term for which he is already appointed in the Senate, but doesn’t want to risk partial representation of his State. In offering for the House of Representatives, Clay says that he was influenced by a “partiality for the station, and by the wishes of some of his friends.” A few months later, Clay writes a letter to James Monroe, which he expresses his partiality to the nature of House of Representatives rather than the Senate, “preferring the turbulence (if I may be allowed the term) of a numerous body to the solemn stillness of the Senate Chamber, it was a mere matter of taste that lead me, perhaps injudiciously, to my station. I shall however continue in the Senate this Session.” (498)

The Papers of Henry Clay, Pg. 473

5.14.2010

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 471



May 14, 1810

In his pursuit to represent the Fifth Congressional District, Clay makes the following statement to his electors: “I am not vain enough to suppose that, in the event of receiving your approbation, I shall carry with me into the House of Representatives the ability to advance in any material degree the interests of my country. All that I dare promise is, that those political principles, which have hitherto directed me, shall continue to be my guide; and that in honest zeal to promote the welfare of the nation I yield to no one.”

The Papers of Henry Clay, pg. 471