9.30.2013

Capture of Malden and Detroit-and the British Army under General Proctor

Capture of Malden and Detroit-and the British Army under General Proctor.

 
Extract of a letter from General Harrison to the Department of War.
Head Quarters, Sandwich, U.C.
30th Sept. 1813.

 
Sir-Gen. Proctor has with him 475 regulars of the 41st and Newfoundland regiments; 60 of the 10th regiment of veterans; 45 dragoons; and from 600 to 1000 Indians. Some deserters who left him the night before last, give the latter as the number. The citizens of Detroit suppose the former to be correct.

The Ottawas and Chippewas have withdrawn from the British, and have sent in three of their warriors to beg for peace, promising to agree to any terms that I shall prescribe. I have agreed to receive them upon condition of their giving hostages for their fidelity, and immediately joining us with all their warriors. The Wyandots, Miamies, and the band of Delawares, which had joined the enemy, are also desirous to be received upon the same terms.

The celebrated chief Main Pock is at the head of the hostile band on the Detroit side of the Streight.  Tecumseh heads that which remains with the British. The inhabitants of Detroit who were in daily communication with them, make the former from 1000 to 1200. Their object in dividing their force, was to make a night attack upon the part of the army which crossed over to Detroit, or that which remained on this side, by a junction of their force some miles above.

A detachment of the army, and some of the vessels of war, will set out for the reduction of Mackinac and St. Joseph’s, in a few days.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your obedient servant.

WILLIAM  H. HARRISON.

Hon. John Armstrong, Sec’ry of War.

 

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 22, 1813.

 

Soldier Casualties


 
A Chillicothe article of September 30, says,-“That 72 officers, sailors, and soldiers, acting as marines, were killed on board the British vessels on Lake Erie; and about the same number wounded; Com. Barclay has died of his wounds.”

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

 

9.29.2013

Letter from Andrew Jackson to John Coffee

Hermitage
Sept. 29th. 1813


for yourself
Dr Colo.

          On yesterday when I wrote you I was so much interrupted, and pestered with company that I fear my letter was not verry intelligable hurried on all sides with starting my runners to endeavour out of the mass of contradictory rumors & information through through so many contradictory channels, to acquire some correct information--added to the pain of my arm--all combined to confuse my ideas. In the midst of my letter the express arrived with Gains letter covering one from Judge Tollman--the former I had copied & enclosed to you--the latter contained the intelligence that the Creeks were collecting all their force and in conjunction with the Spaniards, intended to make an attack on Mobile, and great fears was entertained that, that post would be carried before relief could be afforded; you are in possession of the other rumor from the choctaw interpreter--that they creeks are moving with their families to cross the Mississippi at the chikasaw Bluffs--other rumors that they creeks are collecting all their force to attack Huntsville and the frontier of Tennessee--These various rumours, are in my oppinion created by the British agents to amuse & distract us and draw our attention from their true point of attack--I am inclined to believe that they will never abandon their nation untill they are severely Drubed-- and that they will concentrate their whole force on some point where they can be best supported by their allies the British and Spaniards--and it is highly probable that there whole force may be bent against Mobile--Correct information is all important before we make a movement with our whole force, you will therefore-- on your march to Fort St. Stephens (to which point on the most mature reflection it is best for you with all the force that meets you at Hunstville you had better expeditiously proceed) if you should collect information that the creeks are about to make a movement with their families--you will take an advantageous situation at a point best calculated to intercept th[em] and advise me thereof by express, and by forced marches I will form a Junction with you with my Infantry leaving a sufficient escort to bring up the supplies--Should you find that they are not moving from the Nation with their families, but are contemplating an attack in conjunction with the Spaniards on Mobile--you will immediately notify me by express, and give me the information whether the force in that quarter is sufficient to check them with yours united, and whether from that point an attack upon the Nation would not be as favorable to success as from Dittos landing--I shall exert all my Industry to save Mobile--leaving Genl Cockes Division to cooperate with the Georgians and enter the Nation by the way of coosa river--Keep me well advised from every point the creeks must be scourged--and if the other troops from east Tennessee moves with expedition and I can get supplies we can invelope them--they creeks cannot escape--If I enter the creek country down the coosa, I shall order you to Join me at some point where you  can do it in safety.
       Should the 3rd. Regt. of U.S. Infantry be ordered to cooperate with me--and I am advised thereof, I shall order a Junction at some point in the heart of the Nation--for all this information I shall rely on you for--and act accordingly--I rode home from 4 oclock against dark last evening--from which I find I will be able to move on Sunday next without inconvenience say to your regt. I shall certainly be at Fayettville on the evening of the 6th. of october--prepared to enter the creek country as early as I can get supplies, and correct information where I can make the Blow--I have ordered Colo. Hays to proceed direct to Huntsville to muster your mounted rifflemen--whilst this is doing, you can have as many days provision as will carry you to St. Stephens with such supplies as you can get in the nation--May the gods protect you adieu--

                                                                            Andrew Jackson

9.28.2013

Extract of a letter from an officer of the U.S. army to the Sec. of War

Extract of a letter from an officer of the U.S. army to the Sec. of War, dated

“CHILICOTHE, Sept. 28.1813.
“Altho’ much has been said on the subject of the barbarities of the enemy tour countrymen, that the fortune of war have place in their power, and which had been supported by proofs undeniable; still some even those honored with the proud name of Americans pretend to doubt the authenticity of their origin. I am therefore, form a sense of duty to my country and my injured fellow brethren in arms, induced to make known to you a confirmation in part from the lips of a British officer now on his parole in this town, of the enormities committed on our soldiery at Raisin, and Miami, opposite for Meigs, by the Indians under the command of general Protor. In conversation with him, he informed me that after the surrender of the Kentuckians under col Dudley at the Rapids of the Maima of the lakes, he was near general Proctor’s tent when one of our unfortunate officers came up and asked the general ‘where they were to be quartered?’ that Proctor imperiously ordered him off-that the officer retired but a few yards, when he was met by a small party of Indians and inhumanly murdered under the eye of Proctor.

Another instance he relates of a soldier that was taken during the last siege of fort Meigs by a party of Indians and conducted to the British general’s camp painted black, (a mark they always affix to prisoners when sentence of death is pronounced on them), that some one of the officers (he thinks lieutenant-colonel Short, lately killed at Sandusky) went to their general to intercede for the poor captive; that he was ordered off, and severely reprimanded for interesting himself for a ‘damned Yankee’ and that shortly after the prisoner was conducted and barbarously butchered in the face of the British army.
The same officer also relates a conversation that took place between Proctor and Tecumseh, in which the latter observed ‘I conquer to save, and you to murder.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 15, 1813.

9.27.2013

From the Frontiers

FROM THE FRONTIERS

Boston September 27.
Movement of the Northern Army.

 
We learn by a gentleman who arrived in this town yesterday afternoon, direct from Cumberland head, which place he left on Tuesday last, that General HAMPTON, with the Northern army commenced his march from Cumberland head on Monday last and encamped the same evening at Odleton, seven miles within the British lines, and about 40 miles from Montreal. Notwithstanding all the efforts of the Tories, 500 of the New York militia then at Plattsburg, VOLUNTEERED to cross the lines with Gen. Hampton.
Desertions from the German regiment in the British service were very frequent.
The British had refused to receive Colonel GARDNER, who had lately been appointed Agent for prisoners at Quebec.

Chronicle.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 8, 1813.

Capture of Malden

Capture of Malden.

A letter has been received at the war department from Gen. Harrison, dated at Amherstburg, the 27th ult. informing that he had taken possession of that town, without opposition-that Gen. Proctor had retreated to Sandwich, with his regulars and Indians, having previously burned the fort, navy yard, barracks and public store houses. Gen. H. intends to pursue Gen. P. but without hopes of overtaking him-Com. Perry’s fleet are at anchor off Malden. The Commodore writes thus to the Secretary of the Navy: “The army under Major-General Harrison have this moment entered into Malden, without opposition, and the squadron are now at anchor off the town.” The letter is dated 27th September.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 22, 1813.

9.25.2013

The War

THE WAR.

Copy of a letter from Com. Chauncey to the Secretary of the Navy, dated
U.S. Ship General Pike, Niagara River, 25th Sept. 1813.

SIR-After I had the honor of addressing you on the 13th, I continued to blockade the enemy until the 17th, when the wind blowing heavy from the westward, the enemy having run into Kingston, and knowing that he could not move from that place without a change of wind, I took the opportunity of running into Sacket’s Harbor.
I remained but a few hours at the harbor, and left it at day light on the morning of the 18th, but did not arrived here until yesterday, owing to continued head winds, not having laid our course during the passage. On the 19th I saw the enemy’s fleet near the False Ducks, but took no notice of him as I wished him to follow me up the Lake.
There is a report here, and generally believed, that Capt. Perry has captured the whole of the enemy’s fleet on Lake Erie. If this should prove true in all its details, (and God grant that it may) he has immortalized himself and not disappointed the high expectations formed of his talents and bravery.
I have learnt from a source which can be depended upon, that we did the enemy much more injury in our renconter on the 11th than I had expected. I find that we killed Captain Mulcaster of the royal George and a number of his men, and did considerable injury to that ship, as well as several of the other vessels. It was truly unfortunate that we could not have brought the enemy to a general action on that day, as I am confident that the victory would have been as complete as that upon Lake Erie. I, however, have the consolation to now that every exertion was used to bring him to close action. If we did not succeed it was not our fault.

I have the honor to be, &c.
ISAAC CHAUNCEY.
The hon. William Jones.

Secretary of the Navy.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 15, 1813.

 

Events of the War on Lake Ontario

EVENTS OF THE WAR,
ON LAKE ONTARIO.
__

Copy of a letter from Commodore Chauncey to the Secretary of the Navy, dated

U.S. ship General Pike, Niagara River, Sept. 25.
SIR-After I had the honor of addressing you on the 13th, I continued to blockade the enemy until the 17th when the wind blowing heavy from the westward, the enemy having run into Kingston, and knowing that he could not move from that place before a change of wind, I took the opportunity of running into Sacket’s Harbor.

I remained but a few hours at the Harbour, and left it at day light on the morning of the 18th, but did not arrive here until yesterday, owing to the continued head winds, not having laid our course during the passage. On the 19th, I saw the enemy’s fleet near the False Ducks, but took no notice of him, as I wished him to follow me up the Lake.

There is a report here, and generally believed, that capt. Perry has captured the whole of the enemy’s fleet on Lake Erie. If this should prove true in all its details (and God grant that it may) he has immortalized himself, and not disappointed the high expectations formed of his talents and bravery.

I have learnt from a source which can be depended upon, that we did the enemy much more injury in our rencountre on the 11th, than I expected-I find that we killed Capt. Mulcaster, of the Royal George, and a number of his men, and did considerable injury to that ship, as well as several of the other vessels. It was truly unfortunate that we could not have brought the enemy to a general action on that day, as I am confident the victory would have been as complete as that upon Lake Erie. I however have the consolation to know that every exertion was used to bring him to close action. If we did not succeed it was not our fault. –I have the honor to be, &c.

ISSAC CHAUNCEY.

 

The Hon. William Jones, Secretary of the Navy Washington

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

9.24.2013

Copy of a letter from Commodore O.H. Perry, to the Secretary of the Navy

Copy of a letter from Commodore O.H. Perry, to the Secretary of the Navy, dated
U.S. Schooner Ariel, Put-in-Bay, September 24th, 1813.

SIR,

I have the honour to acquaint you, that about 1200 troops were yesterday transported to a small island, distant about 4 leagues from Malden, notwithstanding it blew hard with frequent squalls. This day, altho’ the weather is not settled, the squadron will again take over as many more. We only wait for favorable weather to make a final move. I need not assure you, sir, that every possible exertion will be made by the officers and men under my command to assist the advance of the army, and it affords me great pleasure to have it  in my power to say, that the utmost harmony prevails between the army and navy.

I have the honour to be, &c.
O.H. PERRY.
The Hon. William Jones,
Secretary of the Nay.

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-October 7, 1813.

 

Copy of a Letter from Commodore O.H. Perry to the Secretary of the Navy

Copy of a letter from Commodore O.H. Perry to the Secretary of the Navy, dated
U.S. sch. Ariel, Put in Bay,
Sept. 24th, 1813.

 
SIR-I have the honour to acquaint you that about twelve hundred troops were yesterday transported to a small island, distant about four leagues from Malden, notwithstanding it blew hard, with frequent squalls. This day, although the weather is not settled, the squadron will again take over as many more. We only wait for favourable weather to make a final move. I need not assure you, Sir, that every possible exertion will be made by the officers and men under my command to assist the advance of the army, and it affords me great pleasure to have it in my power to say, that the utmost harmony prevails between the army and navy. I have the honor to be, &c.

O.H. PERRY.

 
The Hon. Wm. Jones, Secretary of the Navy.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

Latest intelligence from the North-Western army

The latest intelligence from the North-Western army, is contained in a letter from Com. Perry, dated September 24th, in which he states that 1200 troops were on the day preceding transported to an island about 4 leagues from Malden, and that the same number would be transported by the squadron on the day of the date of his letter. Malden, of course, was not at that time taken by our forces.

A letter from this army, dated Sept. 10, states that the whole force is between 8 and 10,000 effective men, and adds, “Harrison says he will have Malden in a week.” The English force at Malden is said to be about 900, and the Indians 3000.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 8, 1813.

 

British Seamen

A gentleman arrived on Wednesday evening from N. London, reports that eight British seamen arrived at Stonington on Monday last, having deserted from the British frigate Aeasta, off that place.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

Order to the Tennessee Volunteers

Head Quarters Nashville
Sept. 24th 1813

Order
Brave Tennesseans!

         Your frontier is threatened with invasion by the savage foe! Already to they advance towards your frontier with their scalping knifes unsheathed, to butcher your wives, your children, and your helpless babes. Time is not to be lost. We must hasten to the frontier, or we will find it drenched in the blood of our fellow- citizens.
         I am commanded by his excellency Gov. Blount, to call into the field, at the shortest possible day, two thousand men of the Volunteer infantry and militia of my division. The undersigned therefore orders, that the whole of his volunteer Infantry, that composed the detachment under his command in the late Expedition for the defence of the lower country, rendezvous at Fayetteville, Lincoln County, on Monday the 4th of October next, well equipped for active service--And the Brigadier-Generals commanding the 4th. 5th. 6th. 7th. and 9th. brigades, composing my division will respectively furnish from their brigades two hundred men well equipped for active service who will rendezvous on the said 4th day of October, at Fayetteville aforesaid--They will be taken from the first class for duty, unless furnished by voluntary tender of service.
        The present crisis will try the patriotism of my division--Your Country relies on it. Your General has the utmost confidence that the full number will appear at the day and place well equipped and ready to meet the foe.
       The health of your General is restored--he will command in person.
       Brigadier General Isaac Roberts is ordered to take command of the Militia. The senior Colonels John K Winn and Thomas McCrory--and the two senior first Majors, and the two senior second Majors are ordered for Duty.
       The Volunteers will be commanded by their own officers.
       The Captains of their respective companies when organized, will furnish each of them a Waggon and team to transport the baggage &c of their companies the expence of which will be paid by the assistant deputy quarter master.

                                                                          Andrew Jackson
                                                                          Majr Gen. 2d. Division. T.

9.23.2013

The Capture of Malden

THE CAPTURE OF MALDEN.

Copy of a letter from Maj. Gen. Harrison to the War Department.
Head Quarters Amherstburg, September 23d, 1813.

 SIR-I have the honour to inform you that I landed the army under my command about 3 miles below this place at 3 o’clock this evening, without opposition, and took possession of the town in an hour after Gen. Proctor has retreated to Sandwich with his regular troops and Indians, having previously burned the Fort, Navy Yard, Barracks and Public Store Houses-the two latter were very extensive covering several acres of ground. I will pursue the enemy tomorrow, although there is no probability of overtaking him, as he has upwards of 1000 horses, and we have not one in the army. I shall think myself fortunate to be able to collect a sufficiency to mount the general officers. It is supposed here that Gen. Proctor River French, 40 miles from Malden.

I have the honour to be, &c.
WM. H. HARRISON.

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-October 14, 1813.

9.22.2013

A Proclamation

A PROCLAMATION.

By William Henry Harrison Major General in the army of the United States and commander in chief of the 8th Military District.

The enemy having been driven from the Territory of Michigan, & a part of the army under my command having taken possession of it, it becomes necessary that the civil government of the territory should be re established, and the former officers renew the exercise of their authority, I have therefore thought proper to proclaim that all appointments and commissions which have been derived from British officers are at an end; that the citizens of the territory are restored to all the rights and privileges which they enjoyed previously to the capitulation made by Gen. Hull on the 15th of August, 1812. Under the present circumstances, and until the will of the government be known, I have thought proper to direct that all persons, having civil offices in the Territory of Michigan at the period of the capitulation of Detroit, resume the exercise of the powers appertaining to their offices respectively. In the present dispersed state of its population may officers thus situated the last incumbent who resigned the office will resume the exercise of its duties. The laws in force at the period above mentioned will be re-established, and continue in force until repealed by the proper authority.  

Given at Head Quarters on the 22th day of Sept. 1813.
WILLIAM H. HARRISON.
By the General.
John O’Fallon, Aid de camp.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

NEW-LONDON, SEPT. 22

Admiral Warren has left the Chesapeake with the greater part of his fleet; and has sailed for Halifax, not Bermuda. He makes Halifax his H.Q. during the autumn and winter.
__
NEW-LONDON, SEPT. 22-Last evening, considerable alarm was excited, from a report having been circulated that several hundred men from the British fleet, had landed at Mill-Stone-Point, 4 miles from this place. After a considerable bustle it was ascertained that a number of marines were landed on Two-Tree-Island, near Mill-Stone.

It is reported that the Valiant has been aground off Goshen Reef for two days past. She has during that time appeared to be stationary.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

 

9.21.2013

Albany Mail of Last Night

Albany Mail of last night.

ALBANY, SEPT. 21.

FROM LAKE ONTARIO.
We inserted a postscript in a part of our last impression, stating that Commodore Chauncey had blocked up Sir James Yeo and his squadron in Amherst Bay; and that the northern army had crossed from Burlington to Cumberland Head, about six miles north of Plattsburgh. We have nothing further from Com. Chauncey, except a variety of reports as to the particular bay in which the enemy’s squadron have taken shelter. From the expressions “blocked up,” and “penned us,” made use of in the letters, we presume it cannot be Amherst bay, as from that there is a channel in the rear of Amherst island, through which the enemy can pass to Kingston. One letter states it to be South bay, and another a small bay near the Oil Ducks. It is said Chauncey had challenged Yeo to single combat of the Pike and Wolfe, and that the knight had declined the invitation.

The Buffalo Gazette mentions, that Gen. Wilkinson is fast recovering from an indisposition with which he has been exercised since his arrival at Fort George.

The same paper also mentions, that Gen. Williams had left Fort George to take command at Sacket’s Harbor: but we imagine he has gone to join the army under Hampton.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

 

 

From Springfield, Sept. 21

From Springfield, Sept. 21.

“The Stage driver last night from the West reports, that a gentleman from Albany, who stopped at Stockbridge, brought the verbal news, that Com. Chauncey had succeeded in taking the Royal George and two other vessels, belonging to the enemy in the recent engagement; which news was received a short time before the stage left Albany. The remainder succeeded in getting into Kingston.”

We understand, two Stages leave Albany about the same hour; and that the driver who furnishes this information, is not the same one who brought the Albany Stage in town, on Tuesday evening.

 

Published in the Boston Messenger-September 24, 1813.

9.20.2013

Copy of a letter Commodore Perry to the Secretary of the Navy

Copy of a letter Commodore Perry to the Secretary of the Navy.
__

U.S. schr. Ariel, off Portage River.
September 20, 1813.
SIR-Since I last did myself the honor of writing you, the vessels under my command have been employed in moving the army from the camps at Portage river & Ft. Meigs to Put-in-bay. A considerable body of troops have already arrived at that place. General Cass, commanding at the bay, mentioned to me a few moments before I left him this morning, that a man had arrived from Detroit, who reported that the Indians had burnt that place. The General had not seen the man; two of his officers conversed with him.

Very respectfully I have the honor to be, &c.

 
O.H. PERRY.

The Hon. WM. JONES,
Secretary of the Navy.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 8, 1813.

Copy of a letter from Com. Perry to the Secretary of the Navy

Copy of a letter from Com. Perry to the Secretary of the Navy.

U.S. Schooner Ariel, off Portage River, Sept. 20th, 1813.

 
SIR-Since I last did myself the honor of writing you, the vessels under my command have been employed in moving the army from the camps at Portage River and Fort Meigs to Put-in –Bay. A considerable body of troops have already arrived at that place. Gen. Cass, commanding at the bay, mentioned to me a few moments before I left him this morning that a man had arrived from Detroit, who reported that the Indians had burnt that place. The Gen. had not seen the man: two of his officers conversed with him.

Very respectfully, I have the honor to be, &c.

O.H. PERRY.

The Hon. William Jones, Secretary of the Navy.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 8, 1813.

 

NEW-YORK,. SEPT. 20

NEW-YORK, SEPT. 20.-To remove all doubts respecting the prevailing report of the blockade of the ports of North-Carolina, namely, all the inlets leading into Albemarle and Pentico Sounds, we are authorized to say, that the same are effectually declared to be in a state of rigorous blockade, since the first of the present month; and that the Spanish Consul, now absent from Norfolk, has received the notification thereof from Admiral Warren.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

9.17.2013

Washington City, Sept. 27


Washington City, Sept. 27.

Notwithstanding that the opposition have all along endeavored to embarrass the war upon Canada piously representing it as wicked, and striving to prevent and beat down every kind of warlike preparation, whether by water, or land in that quarter-yet it ought not to surprise us if their factions prints were now to turn about, and with becoming modesty, claim the great and gallant Perry’s victory as their own, protesting that they built this navy, and that the Republicans had nothing at all to do with it!!

Nat. Int.

___

Chilicothe Sept. 17.

“I feel satisfied that Perry had fought the battle of Molden on the lake. I apprehend Harrison will have nothing to do but to re-occupy our territory, and take quiet possession of that of the enemy, except so far as he may employ his force in settling with and paying off the arrearages due to the forces under Brig. Gen. Tecumseh, &c.

“Large reinforcements have gone on to the North-Western Army. Governor Shelby, of Kentucky, is perhaps at this time with the army, at the head of 4 or 5,000 troops. Colonel Johnston’s 1500 mounted troops are there. Two thousand Ohio Militia have marched; and 6 or 700 United States’ riflemen, under the command of Col. Smith, from Tennessee, will be here to-morrow-all destined for Harrison’s Army. Prospects begin to brighten at last, and I think we may now look for this lengthened campaign to be brought to a speedy and successful close.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 1, 1813.

The Illustrious Dead

The Illustrious Dead.

NEW-YORK, SEPT. 17.-Yesterday, agreeably to the arrangement of the Corporation, published in the Mercantile Advertiser, the bodies of our ever to be lamented countrymen, Capt. James Lawrence and Lieut. Augustus C. Ludlow, were consigned to the “narrow house”-“the house appointed for all living.” We never witnessed, on any occasion, a procession so large and so respectable. The bodies were brought from the Navy Yard in barges, each rowed by 14 seamen, dressed in white; they passed round the battery and fort, and landed at the Steam boat dock at the foot of Greenwich street, where the Procession formed, and moved up Greenwich-street, through Chamber-street, down Broadway to Trinity Church. The concourse of citizens was so large that the Procession consumed more than three hours. The bells were tolled; minute-guns were fired from the Battery and the Navy-Yard; and the colors of the vessels in the harbor were displayed at half-mast. The Right Rev. Bishop Hobart performed the funeral service. The whole scene was singularly solemn and impressive.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813. 

The Sloop of War Frolic

The Sloop of War Frolic,

Which was launched on Saturday last, is perhaps one of the finest modeled vessels which ever floated on the ocean. She was built by Mr. Barker, jr. of Charlestown; and has been completed with an expedition that reflects great credit on the enterprise, as well as skill and ingenuity of the architect.
__

The new Sloop of War launched on Saturday at Charlestown, is called the FROLIC, in compliment to Captain JONES.
__

A Sloop of War is now building at New-York, to be called the PEACOCK, as a tribute to the memory of Capt. Lawrence.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 17, 1813.

 

 

The Shannon

The Shannon, Capt. Stenhouse, (of the Martin sloop of war) is said to be bound on a cruise in Boston bay, for about 14 days, when she is to return to Halifax, where Capt. Broke will again take command of her and proceed to England.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 17, 1813.

 

Remains of the Lamented Officers

The remains of the lamented officers of the Chesapeake, Lawrence and Ludlow, have arrived at New York. Yesterday they were to receive, under the charge of the Common Council of that city, their third interment. The brigade of Gen. Morton was ordered out, to pay the military honors. The Common Council have made a grant of $1000 to each of the children of Capt. Lawrence, to be held in trust for them by the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, until they become of age.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 17, 1813.

Battle on Lake Ontario

Battle on Lake Ontario.

A gentleman who arrived in town last evening, and who left Albany yesterday morning, informs, that intelligence had been received there, and published in handbills, that on the 9th inst. a long and very rapid cannonading was heard at Great Sodus, and no doubt was entertained that a general engagement had taken place between the American and British fleets. But its result was, of course, not known. Sodus is about two thirds the distance from Niagara to Sacket’s Harbor.

Com. Chauncey, when he sailed, left two schs. at Sacket’s Harbor. The fleet of Ad. Yeo was superior in number of guns.

Our informant left Sacket’s Harbor on the 8th inst. For two days previous a partial firing had been heard on the lake, supposed to have been occasioned either by the fleet’s firing at a distance while maneuvering, or by two privateers which had sailed from the harbor, and which might be in chase of some merchant vessel.

Nothing but skirmishes had recently occurred at Fort George; but the British had reinforced themselves from Kingston.

Col. Ripley with his troops returned to Sacket’s Harbor-the recent movements being a faint.-Gen. Brown commercials. Lt. Shannon of the 3d artillery had recently died at the harbor, but the troops were, is general, healthy.

The militia requisition was proceeding in the state of New York; but had not been so successful as had been expected, as to volunteers, particularly at Albany.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 17, 1813.

Turreau's Letter

Turreau’s Letter.

Among other topicks of complaint urged against our government in this letter, the reader will recollect that of seducing French seamen from their allegiance.

Some years since we published certain intercepted depatches from Admiral Willaumex, among them was one to Turreau in which the admiral says, “I have just apprehended four seamen, deserters from the Valareuse frigate, which I found on board an American brig, where they had engaged at 17 dollars per month. Now, sir, if you can succeed in making the American government pay down a compensation for this misconduct in seducing thus our seamen, you will punish it by making it smart in that point which it feels most, viz: its avarice in money, and with so much the more justice, since they have for three years past, been continually injuring our marine, by seducing our best seamen from us.”

This extract furnishes an example of the contempt in which the French public functionaries hold our government, and corresponds with Turreau’s letter-it establishes another important fact, that is, that the British are not the only nation that insists on the right, and are in the practice of taking their seamen from our merchant vessels.

[Gazette.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 17, 1813.

 

9.16.2013

Newport, Oct. 5th

Newport, Oct. 5-This morning arrived in this harbor the British privateer sloop Dart, of 6 guns and 20 men on board, Capt. Ross, of St. Johns, prize to the U.S. Revenue Cutter Vigilant, Capt. John Cahoone, of this port. The privateer was seen from this town yesterday afternoon, off Point Judith, having in co. a ship, brig and sch. which she had detained. Capt. Cahoone, immediately manned his Cutter with volunteers from town, and with seamen from the flotilla, and with a zeal and alacrity which does him great credit went in pursuit of the privateer, and in 5 hours came up with and carried her, after a light resistance, by boarding. The 1st  Lieut. of the Dart was killed at the helm, and one man from the Cutter was slightly wounded.

The privateer had released the ship and brig previous to her being captured-but the sch. which was from N.York bound to Portsmouth, with 250 barrels flour, she had manned out.

The Dart captured on Friday last, a sloop from New-Bedford, bound on a whaling voyage.

The capture of this privateer by Capt. Cahoone, has unquestionably been the means of saving a large amount of property from being captured, as a great number of coasters with valuable cargoes, from New-York, came down Sound last night, which the privateer would have captured.

Arrived this morning, Spanish brig Felix, Yeliche, 32 days from Havana, bound to North Carolina, with sugar, but off Ocracoke, was boarded by the British sch Paz, who made the following endorsement-

“H.M. sch. Paz-Warned off from entering Ocracoke, Beaufort, and all the ports from Georgia to New-Nork inclusive, as being under a very strict blockade.”

J. DUMAREY, Lieut. Com.

 

Sept. 16, 1813.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 8, 1813.

9.15.2013

Indian War-Milledgeville, Sept. 15

Indian War.

MILLEDGEVILLE, SEPT. 15.-If it be true that one thousand Indians have gone against the “Tombigbee settlement,” as stated by a friendly party who came to Fort Hawkins on Saturday, we have cause to tremble for the fate of our brethren in that quarter. The frontier being extensive and but thinly settled, considerable injury may be done before a sufficient force can be collected to oppose them. We understand that two of the friendly towns, containing an hundred warriors each, have become hostile. Unless the expedition which is on foot be put in motion soon, we shall not be surprised if in a little while the whole nation follow the example.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

9.14.2013

Battle on Lake Ontario

Office of the Albany Argus, Tuesday Evening, Sept. 14.

BATTLE ON LAKE ONTARIO.
Extract of a letter to a gentleman in this city dated Sackett’s Harbour, Sept. 11, 1813.
“An engagement took place between the fleets yesterday. The firing (by broadsides) was distinctly heard here for some hours. A boat from Great Sodus, arrived here last night, and brings information that some guns were heard in the night of the 9th, again on the morning of the 10th; that they appeared to have been fired about the centre of the Lake; that it was evidently a running fire, traveling north westerly; that ten minutes before three o’clock it became stationary, general, and incessant, and so continued till about 5. The wind is brisk from the west, and so it will probably bring advices of the result. The battle was fought between the Isle of Touli and Presque Isle, on the north shore of the Lake.”

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-September 23, 1813.

Norfolk, Sept. 14

Norfolk, Sept. 14.

On Saturday last, about 15 men volunteered from a militia company stationed near the inlet, to go and attack a party of British who were said to be on shore at the Cape. When they came to the Cape, and were mounting one of the Sandhills, they found themselves in full view, and within musket shot of a large body of marines who were exercising.-A cluster of officers were standing some distance off between their main body and our militia-the latter had not a moment to spare-they took deliberate aim at the officers, and fired; four of them fell!-The militia then made the best of their way back to camp, while the enemy’s shot whistled over their heads in all directions, but without effect.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

BUFFALO, SEPT. 14

BUFFALO, SEPT. 14-We understand, from good authority, that the Fever which has been prevalent in this quarter for a month past, rages in some districts in Canada, to alarming degree; and what renders it more distressing, but little medical aid can be obtained.

Deserters continue to come in from the British army. It appears from several sources, that the Indians have all left the British army in the neighborhood of Fort George. It is supposed they have gone to join Gen. Proctor at Malden.

We have no positive intelligence from the west since our last paper. It is, however, rumoured that Com. Perry has driven the British fleet under Com. Barclay, into Detroit river; and it is prophesied that ere this Gen. Harrison has appeared at Brownstown, and will fortify Gross Island, (lying in Detroit River, near Malden) preparatory to his descent on Canada.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

 

From Lake Ontario

From Lake Ontario.

Extract of a letter from an officer on board the Pike-dated
U.S. ship Gen. Pike, on Lake Ontario, Sept. 14, 1813.

“We have had a running fight with the enemy of six hours-this ship only able to get near him. We have driven him in, and have received very little damage-a few shot in the bull, and our sails and rigging a little cut. Could our fleet have got up, we should have gained a glorious victory-it is now half a one, as he is driven from the head of the lake, in the face of both armies. In great haste.”
__
After our paper was put to press, (says the Ontario Messenger, of the 14th inst.) we received the following:-

From information just received from Sodus, and in which we place much confidence, we state that two of the enemy’s vessels, captured by Commodore Chauncey’s squadron were seen lying off Putneyville; and it is reported from the same source, that another of their vessels, said to be the Royal George or Prince Regent, was sunk. We are in expectation momently to hear further particulars of this important event.

Although this article is not dissimilar to the one below from Springfield, still we must doubt its credibility, more particularly so, as the letter from an officer on board the Gen. Pike, of the same date, makes no mention of any captures, or particular loss on either side.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813.

 

9.13.2013

Interesting Correspondence

Interesting Correspondence.

PORTLAND, SEPT. 16-On Monday last, the British sloop of war Rattler, with two other armed vessels of smaller size, appeared off our port, and the Rattler stood in near to the land, with a white flag at her fore-top gallant-mast head.-Soon after, a boat from her, bearing a flag, proceeded to Fort Scammel, with a Lieutenant, who presented the following note from Capt. Gordon to Col. Learned.-This, with the Col’s reply and the letter of the Marshal, we have solicited for publication.
__

His Britannic Majesty’s Ship Rattler,
Off Portland, 13th Sept. 1813.

Sir-Having, during the time I have been on this station, released and sent into Portland, many American subjects, made prisoners, by His Majesty’s ships under my command; and having released, on parole, the captain, officers and crew of the armed ship Alexander, taken on our coast, in May last, I have been induced to send in a Flag of Truce, in the hope that the surviving officers and crew of His Majesty’s late gun brig Boxer, may be sent out to me, either in exchange for the captain and crew of the Alexander, whose parole I have sent in by the officer in charge of this letter, or in exchange for the same number of officers and men of the late United States’ ship Chesapeake, which shall be regularly ratified by the proper authorities, on the Admiral at Halifax receiving the intelligence.-Should this request not be complied with, motives of humanity to the friends of the survivors, will, I trust, induce you to suffer the bearer to have communication with the late officers of the Boxer, in order to ascertain the names of those who have fallen in this unequal conflict.

I have the honor to be,

Sir, your ob’dt humble servant.
ALEX GORDON, Captain.

The Commondant of the Garrison at Portland.
__
Fort Seammed, 13th Sept. 1813.

Sir-I have received your communication by the officer bearing your flag. In answer, I can only observe, that I have no authority vested in me to treat upon an exchange of prisoners, the sole power for which is vested in the Commissary General of Prisoners of War, at Washington.-The men taken in His Majesty’s brig Boxer have been sent to Boston, except the wounded, who are attended by their own Physician, under the direction of their own officers, and you may rest assured that every thing will be furnished them, that can contribute to their comfort. The politeness and humanity, with which Capt. Gordon has treated those, whom the fortune of war has thrown into his power, I trust will be remembered with respect for his character, even by those whom war may have made his enemies; and I regret that my duty will totally forbid a compliance with his request, for an interview with the officers of the Boxer.

I have the honor to be, sir, your ob’dt servant.
J.D. LEARNED, Col. Comd’t.
ALEX GORDON, Esq. Capt. H.B.M ship Rattler.
__
Fort  Scammel, Sept. 13th, 1813.

Sir-Col. Learned having communicated your letter of this day to me, I have the honor to state to you, that no power is vested in me to exchange prisoners of war, or parole them without the country. The officers of the Boxer who survived the action, are parolled and treated as gentlemen, and brave men who contended with courage in a very equal contest for victory and glory. The wounded are in the same hospital with the wounded of the Enterprise, and as well treated Capt. Blythe’s body was buried with the same honors as the body of Capt. Burrows, and the remains of the two brave men lay near each other. Your prisoners are treated with humanity, and my personal attention to them will be given to make them comfortable. I witnessed the handsome treatment of Captain Gordon to the officers of the Alexander. I am proud to say his reputation stands high as a humane officer, and regret that those officers whom the fate of war has made prisoners, cannot be permitted to communicate with the Flag this evening.

I have the honor to be, sir, your ob’t servant.
T.G. THORNTON, Marshal of Me.
ALEX GORDON, Esq. Capt. H.B. M. ship Ruttler.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-September 24, 1813..

 

9.12.2013

Albany Argus

ALBANY ARGUS, EXTRA.

Wednesday Morning, Sept. 15.
The following is the only intelligence furnished by last evening’s mail, relative to the recent engagement on Lake Ontario.
Messenger Office, Canandagua, Sept. 12

NAVAL BATTLE ON LAKE ONTARIO.
Public anxiety has been so much excited by the severe cannonading which has been heard from the Lake during yesterday, that we hasten to lay before the readers of the Messenger the latest accounts upon the subject. Our information is derived from two expresses whom we dispatched to the mouth of Cheater River and to Pultneyville. It appears that on Wednesday the fleets approached each other, ours consisting of eleven sail and the British of eight. They maneuvered for the windward till Saturday, when Com. Chauncey obtained the weather gage, keeping the British fleet between him and the Lake shore.
About 2 P.M. he brought the enemy to an engagement, which lasted two hours, when in consequence of the British squadron being better sailors, they shot ahead so as to be out of reach of our guns. Our fleet pursued till about half an hour before sun-set, the Pike came up with the enemy, and passed between the Wolf and another vessel, with the intention of separating them from the fleet. These vessels commenced fire upon the Pike, which was returned, and the remainder of the enemy’s ships held back until the whole of our fleet came up, when an action of an hour’s continuance again ensued, after which the enemy sailed off & the last that was seen of them they had separated from our fleet, which was still in pursuit. From the Lake’s being extremely foggy our informant saw no more of them after dark.
By all accounts it appears our fleet have had the advantage throughout. Our information is certain that our shot did much more execution than the enemy’s. He was in a situation to judge, being in a skiff about a miles distant from the fleets, most of the time. The fleets were our long pieces would be most effectual.
The new schooner the Sylph was in the engagement. If the enemy do not hasten to take shelter in Kingston harbour, they will inevitably be conquered. Sir James Yeo has taken a lesson from his pupil, a little beyond the “first rudiments of seamanship.” Sir James’s sails have helped him more than his guns.

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-September 23, 1813.