10.31.2013

Letter from Andrew Jackson to Leroy Pope

[October 31, 1813]


Sir

     Amongst the prisoners sent to your charge 28 in number, I find their is a choctaw woman who many years ago was made a prisoner and a slave purchased by Cotala whose village we have destroyed, and given to his negro fellow for a wife her & her three children are considered slaves, they will be held by us as such untill I can discover her family, in the choctaws and restored to them--This wench & her children will not be considered as prisoners for exchange or ransom
     we have got a good supply of Beef, and hope you will furnish us with regular supplies of meal & meat hereafter--The irregularity of supplies has retarded my progress verry much, and I am anxious to reach the center of the creek country, and give them a final blow, and then strike at the root of the disseas pensacola--I am verry respectfully yr mo ob serv

                                                                               Andrew Jackson

P S. Make my compliments acceptable to your lady & Miss Maria-- I think shortly I shall be able to send Miss Maria the princesses necklace

                                                                                              A. J

10.30.2013

Rogersville (E. Ten) Oct. 30

Rogersville (E. Ten) Oct. 30.

Just as our paper was going to press, we received the following press, we received the following pleasing intelligence from two gentlemen who passed through town, immediately from the Cherokee nation. They state that the Cherokee Indians were in advance of our army under Col. Coffey, as their ardor could not be restrained-That they surprised the Creeks in their encampment and fell upon them with great fury, put them to flight, and killed upwards of sixty of them. The Creeks were so panic struck, that they never fired a gun, of course none of the Cherokees were killed.
E.T. Gaz.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

 

Extract of a letter from Albany, dated October 30, 1813.

Extract of a letter from Albany, dated October 30, 1813.

“Gen. Harrison, with a part of his army arrived at Buffaloe on or about the 20th October-destination supposed to be Kingston.
“Gen. Hampton, with his army, left the Four Corners on the 22d, and the last accounts left him at Canghawa, on the river of St. Lawrence, from 10 to 12 miles from to Montreal.”
“Letters from Sackett’s Harbor state that Gen. Wilkinson, with his army was to have left Grenadier Island, on the 22d Oct.-destination supposed to descend the River St. Lawrence.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

10.29.2013

New-York, Oct. 29

New-York, Oct. 29.

The North mail, arrived last night, furnishes us with the British account of Proctor’s disaster. They say they were opposed to an American force of 10 or 12,000 men! And that their defeat was partly owing to some unpardonable neglect in leaving a six pounder on their flank destitute of ammunition!

Letters were received from Sackett’s Harbor on the 23rd ult. which state that the boats from that place had arrived at Grenadier Island, on the 21st, about 28miles above Kingston, where our troops were landed. They only remaining officer left the Harbor the 22d for the army. Destination Kingston or Montreal. The force consists of four Brigades, (about 6000 men) under the command of Gen. Wilkinson, Gen. Lewis 2d in command. The brigades are commanded by Generals Swartwont Boyd, Brown, and Covington. It is supposed Gen. Hampton will join them with about 5000 men. The Secretary at War was a Watertown on the 22.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

 

 

Gen. Harrison's Success

Gen. Harrison’s Success.

Our readers will of course concur in the propriety of omitting the details of the comparatively trivial operations on the banks of Erie, to enable us to lay before them, so far as our limits will admit, what is known of the tremendous shock of nations in the old world. Gen. Harrison’s victory has been complete. We cannot find it in our hearts to quarrel with our successful generals. But we do think that, considering the immense superiority of the American force, as stated by the general himself, it would have been quite as creditable if he had “considered it arrogant to claim for his troops the palm of superior bravery.” We wish also, for the credit of American skill in military tackticks, that less had been said of the entire originality of a charge of mounted infantry, for although we doubt not that the general was “fully convinced that it would succeed,” and (since he has chosen to tell us so) that “the measure was not sanctioned by any thing he had ever seen or heard of,” yet we are not entirely satisfied that it is equally novel to all other military men. We do hope that the time will come when our heroes will learn how much more valuable is that praise which proceeds not from their own mouths.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 29, 1813.

 

10.28.2013

It is said by some, that we shall soon have peace...

It is said by some, that we shall soon have peace, but upon what grounds their expectations are built, it is very difficult to say. There is a report that the British government have sent Lord Walpole to Petersburg to meet our embassadors and hear their propositions, although the mediation of Russia has been totally rejected; and if they should be of such a nature, that he thinks they may be acceded to without compromising either the dignity or interest of his government, there may possibly be an arrangement soon concluded.-Much, however, will depend on the great events in Europe-Should the coalation which has been formed in the North, succeed in strangling the growing power of Bonaparte, our government might perhaps feel themselves ready to relinquish in some degree the claims which they set up for the regulations of nations; and on the contrary, should they fail, the probability is that England would show a greater solicitude to accommodate differences immediately with us. It is no ore for her interest to continue this war than it is to ours, but yet the affairs on the continent of Europe, we are persuaded, will have a very considerable influence towards settling our difficulties. We have had sufficient of war to desire peace, and it will e hailed with joy whenever it takes place; but the prospects we much confess, in our opinion, for a speedy reconciliation, are by no means flattering.

 

Published the Maryland Gazette-October 28, 1813.

 

Letter from Andrew Jackson to Willie Blount

Camp Wills
28th. Octr. 1813


Sir

        Inclosed I send you a letter from the Govr. of Georgia, which was this evening handed me, by the express I forwarded to him from Huntsville.
        We are now within twenty miles of the "Ten Islands" & it is said, within sixteen of the enemy. Any force they may have so near us,  I cannot believe to be very great; The number however is stated to be about a thousand.
       We shall recommence our march in the morning--having been detained here today, for the purpose of procuring from the neighboring Indians, some small supplies of corn--This acquisition, while it enables us to subsist for the present encourages our hopes for the future--
       Indeed Sir we have been very wretchedly supplied. Scarcely two rations in succession have been regularly drawn. Yet we are not despondent, whilst we can procure an ear of corn a piece, or anything  that will serve as a substitute for it we shall continue our exertions to accomplish the objects for which we were sent out--
         The cheerfulness with which my men submit to privations, & are ready to encounter danger, does honor to the government whose rights they are defending.
        Every measure within my power, for procuring the requisite supplies, I have taken, & am continuing to take. East, West, North, & South have been applied to, with the most pressing solicitation. The Governor of Georgia in a letter, which my express delivered this evening informs me that a sufficiency can be had in his state, both for the men under my command & those under Genl. Cocke; but he does not signify that he is about to take any measures for the purpose of procuring them.
       The Contractor (Mr. Brownlow) who supplied the place of the Reads, has spared no exertion, to fulfill his contract;  but the inconveniences under which he labors, will I am fearful, render his efforts unavailing. Colo. Pope of Huntsville is better prepared than any person of my acquaintance, for such an undertaking; & I yesterday learnt that he was willing to engage in it. I accordingly wrote to him as the best precautionary measure in my power, making him the offer, on the condition that he would indemnify Brownlow, for the trouble he had been at, & recommending that he should be taken in as a partner If he accepts this offer, as no doubt he will, my apprehensions will be greatly diminished
       Genl. White has not yet united with me, but I expect to see him in a few days. He is yet in the Cherokee nation, but I can not tell precisely where.
        Old Chenubbee is now with me--having brought in as prisoners two of the hostile Creeks
        I yesterday sent out Lieut. Col. Dyer with two hundred of the Cavalry to attack a Town called, Littefutchee about 20 miles distant. This morning about 4 O. Clock they returned bringing with them about thirty prisoners, men, women, & children--The Village they burnt. What it very agreeable they state they found in the fields near the Village,  considerable quantity of corn & in the Country round-about many beeves; but they brought in none.

10.26.2013

Norfolk, October 26

Norfolk, October 26.

The enemy baffled in N.Carolina.-We learn by a passenger in the Elizabeth City Stage, that they enemy sent 3 barges of armed men into the Sound on Saturday last for the purposes of cutting out some vessels when a party of the militia of the neighborhood came down upon them, captured one barge and 17 men, and drove off the rest. Among the prisoners were, eleven negroes; some of them, (perhaps all) are supposed to be runaways from Princess Anne County, in which case an example ought, and no doubt will be made of them.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 5, 1813.

 

10.25.2013

Knoxville, Oct. 25

Knoxville, Oct. 25.

Yesterday marched from Camp Williams near this place, 8 companies (500 men) they will be followed immediately by about 1100. These when added to those already marched under Brig. Gen. White, will make an effective force of 3000 men all armed and anxious to avenge the massacre of their brothers at fort Mimms. This force will concentrate near Look out mountain, and will be commanded by Major General John Cooke, an officer from whom much is expected by the public as well as by the troops under his command.

Gazette.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

 

10.24.2013

Letter from Andrew Jackson to Thomas Flournoy

Camp Deposit
24th. Oct. 1813


     After having encountered every difficulty that can possibly arise from the want of Supplies, & from ruggedness of mountains, I have at length reached this place.  Here I established a Depot for the reception of such supplies as may be sent me,  either up or down the river; & shall leave a sufficient number of men to guard it.
    Tomorrow I shall recommence my march by the nearest rout to the "Ten Islands" I understand the hostile Creeks are assembling in considerable numbers in the neighborhood of that place. It is probable I shall get in sight of them in a few days; & after having dispersed them, I shall move with as little delay as practicable, to the junction of the Coosa & Tallapoosa, at that point it is my present purpose, to establish a garrison & remain some time--
    What I dread (when I shall arrive there) infinitely more than the fact of the enemy, is the want of supplies. Can you, by any exertion, procure me supplies of bread stuff & have it forwarded up the river? No service you could render me would be so important, nor impose upon me so lasting and obligation. I shall calculate upon your doing everything in this respect, that possibly can be done.
     The E.T. troops have not yet joined me; but I expect a junction to be formed with me in a few days by General White who commands the advance Division
         I shall be happy at all times to hear from you
         I shall have the honor & c

                                                                                    Andrew Jackson

10.23.2013

From the Erie Centinel Extra Oct. 23

From the Erie Centinel Extra Oct. 23.

Arrival of com Perry and General Harrison.
Arrived yesterday morning the schr. Ariel. Lieut. Packet, from Detroit, having on board Com. Perry, Gen. Harrison and suite, and Capt. Barclay.
It was with no ordinary feelings two heroes were received, to whom we are so much indebted for the present tranquility on our frontier. The rejoicing of the citizens was warm and universal, which they expressed by a federal salute fired from two field pieces on the landing of the Commodore’s boat and in the evening the town was brilliantly illuminated. A procession marched through the town, bearing a transparency, whilst a field piece was discharged at intervals of three minutes the whole being prepared and conducted in the most perfect order, under the direction of the Borough Council, covened for that purpose at twelve o’clock, noon. On the transparency were the following devices: On one side, “Commodore Perry 10th Sept. 1813,” on another “Gen. Harrison, 5th Oct. 1813,” on a third, “Free Trade and Sailor’s Rights,” on a fourth, “Erie.”
Had Gen. Harrison pursued the ordinary mode of warfare: opposed his infantry to that of the enemy; his undiciplined militia to a veteran rengiment allowed to be the best in the British service for maneuvering, he might have overpowered them by numbers, not, however, without a bloody contest; but by a masterly stroke he threw them into confusion, and, in less than two minutes from the commencement of the attack, they surrendered. Thus has it “pleased the Almighty” to relieve us from our enemies in the North West.
Com. Perry and Gen. Harrison having relieved and placed in security the N.W. frontier, the former is on his way to Newport R.I. the latter with his disposable force to join the Northern Army.  THE FLEET CONTAINING THE TROOPS PASSED HERE TODAY.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

From the Erie Centinel Extra of Oct. 23


From the Erie Centinel Extra of Oct. 23.

Arrival of Com Perry and General Harrison.
Arrived yesterday morning the schr. Ariel. Lieut. Packet, from Detroit, having on board Com. Perry, Gen. Harrison and suite, and Capt. Barclay.
It was with no ordinary feelings two heroes were received, to whom we are so much indebted for the present tranquility on our frontier. The rejoicing of the citizens was warm and universal, which they expressed by a federal salute fired from two field pieces on the pursued to Twelve Mile creek by Gen.  M’Clure, who returned on the 13th by way of Beaverdam, Chippaway and Queenstown; and that Col. Scott had left Fort George on the same day with all the regulars for Sacket’s Harbor. This information is confirmed by the Buffalo Gazette, which adds that our militia, in the expedition, found 1000 barrels of flour, 3 or 400 stand of arms, 500 hides, tallow, hats, bread &c. A part of our force still remained out under Col. Chapin.
The Vermont militia lately called in service, have all been dismissed by Gen. Parker, except those who volunteered to cross the Canada line.
Upwards of 200 British prisoners passed through this city on Saturday, from the Harbor, guarded by Capt. M’Tyre’s company of detached light infantry.
A gentleman has just shown us a letter from Fort George, dated the 15th inst. which states that the British had made a stand at Burlington Heights head of Ontario-that Proctor had arrived there with seventeen men! And that an additional number of militia had been ordered in by Gen. M’Clure.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

 

Letter to Pathkiller from Andrew Jackson

Camp on Thompson's Creek
23d Oct. 1813


Brother

          I thank you for the information you have sent me & will always be obli[ged] to you, for any information [t]hat may be of use to m[e.]
          I approve your policy of sending your spies to examine the fires again, which they saw the other day. If they make any important discoveries, communicate them to me without delay. And let me recommend to you, constantly to keep out, as spies, some of your men, in whom you can most confide.
          I shall leave this encampment tomorrow; & shall probably not pass by the Turkey-town, but take the nearest rout to the Ten-Islands. It will give me great pleasure, if I can fall in with that party of the hostile Creeks who were sent against our frontiers. I think it will be the last of their adventures.
          It is time that all our enemies should feel the force of that power, which has indulged them so long, & which they have, so long, treated with insult
                      Respectfully

                                                                  Andrew Jackson
                                                                  Major general

10.22.2013

Extract of a letter, dated Chilicothe, Oct. 22


Extract of a letter, dated Chilicothe, Oct. 22.

“We are told by persons who have been in the engagement when the British Army were captured, that Brigadier General Tecumseh is certainly killed, and a Major of the Kentucky Militia who staid on this town last night had a Rifle with him which he said was Tecumseh’s.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 5, 1813.

Commodore Perry

Lieut. Forrest, of the navy, arrived in this city on the 10th inst. with the flags of the six vessels taken from the British by Commodore Perry, in the glorious action on Lake Erie.-[Nat. Intelligencer.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 22, 1813.

 

American Troops

We learn by a gentleman who left Burlington on the 15th inst. that Gen. Hampton’s army was at Chateaugay the day-before, with their provisions in carriages, and all ready to march, as they had been for several days. Gen. Parker was at Burlington, unwell, and Gen. Izard had proceeded to the army. The prisoners recently made by Col. Clark were Canadian militia.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 22, 1813.

Letter from Pathkiller to Andrew Jackson

Turkey Town
October 22sd. 1813


Friend and Brother:

        I have now to communicate to you the substance of a Talk I had yesterday with two of the hostile Creeks who were sent as messengers from the alabama warrior, who says he had raised a large army with the seminolies to attack the Coweatahs, that they were forced to do so by the Coweatahs, by Killing their people and stealing their horses and that they were Deteremined to take satisfaction for the Injury his people had received.
        he informs me also that he had ordered out another army to be raised to take a revenge for the lives of his people who had been killed--some where not far from Elk river, and the weokee warrior were ordered to head them--they messengers said that it was three nights ago &c. since this last army had crossed the coosee river and the would take the musle shoal path--that they crossed the river below the Ten Islands, and on the return of the army, they Intended to attack the Chenibee and I am advised to be causious how I acted.
       they say they will act candid and give me this information to show they were sincere, and peaceable policy has been persued with them, as my situation required me to do so.
       about fifteen or sixteen of my people have arrived to Join your army. more will arrive today untill the all come, and some others of my people will join General whites army, who I understand arrived at the point of look out mountain (at Ross's) five nights ago--and I expect he is on his way--
       I have spys. out constantly, and send out two for Twenty four hours Tour, and the day before yesterday our spies returned and they only Discovered eleven fires about fifteen miles from this place. my son was one of he spys. and from this account, I concluded they were not warring  because women seen around the fires--I have sent two other spys out this morning and they are Directed to view their camps again
        I am your friend & Brother
                                                                    Path X Killer

PS; I Should be very Glad to hear from you to probable time I might Expect you and army here. am your friend                                                                   Path Killer

Ch. Hicks

Letter from John Coffee to Andrew Jackson

Indian Lands
22nd. Oct. 1813 12 OClock


Genl. Jackson,

        Agreably to your orders, I proceeded, to cross the River at the upper end of the shoals, all my efforts failed to procure a pilot. I took with me one of Meltons sons, who said he knew not the road. he shewd me a path that had been reputed the Black Warriers path-- I proceeded on it in its whole course about 10 degrees East of South, in the early part of the third days march I met Russel who said I was on the right way--at the distance of 80 miles, I crossed a river about 60 yards wide running to the west, where there is a small deserted Indian Village, which Russel said was the Black Warriers town, being convinced it was not, I proceeded over the River, and at about two miles found a cross path leading nearly west, but not in late use, I turned on that path west, and at 13 miles distance come to a small Indian village. corn in the fields but no person to be found got about 100. bushels corn, burnt the houses, and proceeded eight miles further, come to the main Black Warrirs town abandoned by the Inhabitants found some corn in the fields and some old corn in cribbs, fresh signs of One or two Indians, and no other signs--got in the whole about 300. bushels corn, burnt their town or counsel house and about 50 other buildings this town is supposed to be the principal one of the tribe and the lowest down the river. (I am certain its not the nearest to the Shoals) and seeing that the Indians had fled I deemed it not adviseable to go further in search of villages where no other spoils can be had than such as we have found, and having no pilot or even any one that ever had been in the country with me am uninformed if any more are in this quarter, having been two days out of rations the most of the men living on parched corn, I have determined to meet your army, the nearest possible--am now on a path that Russel went out and he says about 30 miles from Dick Browns. have sent on to you the bearer, and must beg that you will order provisions put in a State of readiness for my men when we come up with you--have not heard of you since I left--suppose you will be in advance of Browns, if so will follow on, otherwise will meet you--
          very respectfully your obt. Sevt.

                                                                     Jno. Coffee CC

10.20.2013

Extract of a letter from Albany, dated October 20, 1813.


Extract of a letter from Albany, dated October 20, 1813.
“Gen. Harrison, with a part of his army arrived at Buffaloe on or about the 20th October-destination supposed to be Kingston.
“Gen. Hampton, with his army, left the Four Corners on the 22d, and the last accounts left him at Canghawn, on the river of St. Lawrence, from 10 to 12 miles from to Montreal.”
“Letters from Sacket’s Harbor state that Gen. Wilkinson, with his army was to have left Grenadier Island, on the 22d Oct.-destination supposed to descend the River St. Lawrence.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

Northern Army

NORTHERN ARMY.

Boston, October 23.
From our viable Correspondent at Plattsburg, we last evening received the following, under date of Oct. 20.
“Night before last the army was still a Cheteaugey. Two days previous, the men drew six days’ previsions, and were ordered to be ready to march at two hours notice. Gen. Hampton had assigned every brigade, regiment, rifle corps, troop, company, officer and man their proper parties-had drawn them out in order of battle, and had [illegible] the whole line in review. Since which, Gen. Izard, who it seems is be the fighting General, and is to command the first brigade, arrived, when the whole army was again drawn out in order of battle and passed in review. There is not the most trifling article wanting-the army is completely prepared to march to battle.
It is said that Gen. Hampton is waiting the return of his representative whom he had sent with his plan of campaign to a council of war, ordered by the Secretary of War, to be held at Sackett’s Harbor by the Major-Generals or their representatives; and that the army would not make “a final move” until his return.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 12, 1813.

10.19.2013

The Frontiers

The following articles appeared in Postscripts to the N. York morning papers of the 3d instant, received there by the northern mail.

THE FRONTIERS.

From the Burlington Centinel of October 19.
Latest accounts from the Northern army are down to Monday & Tuesday last. Gen. Hampton had encamped with his army on the south side of the Saint Lawrence, at the Galow Rapids, 15 miles this side of Montreal, and four miles this side the British army, encamped at La Chine, consisting of regulars and militia, said to be about 5000; commanded by Gov. Prevost in person. General Hampton was waiting the arrival of general Wilkinson, who was on Wednesday of last week at Ogdensburg, with his army and about 500 batteaux.
It is said that the inhabitants of Montreal are moving their valuable down to Quebec.
Cols. Clark and Fasset have made their stand at Odletown, their force is about 1300.

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-November 11, 1813.

 

10.18.2013

Letter from Andrew Jackson to Rachel Jackson

Head quarters Camp Coffee
Octobr 18th. 1813


My Love

             By Mr Nichols returning to Nashville, this will be convayed; By Doctor Sanders I learn & Colo. Hays letter that you enjoy health with the young ladies and our dear little Andrew--Colo. Hays says to me he delivered him the pipe--and he was pleased with it--I hope Mr. Nolly has removed and you will no longer be pestered with his neglect or impertinence--I enjoy Health and my arm still mending--I write you this in the Hurry of business preparing to move forward tomorrow at six oclock in the morning--my spies are just in, and all the horrid news of their advancing in great force are untrue--and I must advance to find them--all our friends here are well--Colo. Coffee left me with 700 men four days ago on command I expect him tomorrow, and by him some news of the movement of the Creeks When I Halt at the next deposit for provisions I shall write you--I am sufficiently strong I think to penetrate--to pensacola--with fervent prays for your health our little Andrew and all friends believe me to be yr affectionate Husband

                                                                                           Andrew Jackson

10.17.2013

From the Buffalo Gazette Extra

From the Buffalo Gazette Extra.

BUFFALO, Oct. 19.
Extract from a letter to the Editor, dated Fort George, October 17.
“On the 11th inst. we marched out with a force of eleven hundred inclusive of Indians, to see what had become of the gallant Vincent. But we found that he had absconded precipitately, burning all the public property he could reach. From the best information there can be no doubt but that the appearance of the militia, who were supposed by the enemy to amount to 5000 men, and the employment of the Indians struck terror to their souls and caused their retreat. We marched to the Twelve Mile Creek, and were pursuing the rear guard of the enemy, who were about two hundred strong at the Forty, with baggage and sick. But the movements of col. Scott, who gave us notice that he was about to quite this fort, compelled gen. M’Clure very reluctantly to give up the pursuit. We took a circuit through the country  to Chippewa, and thence to this place.
We have collected immense quantities of public stores-perhaps 1000 barrels of flour, 3 or 400 stand of arms, 5000 hides, tallow, bread, hats, &c. The conduct of the Indians ought to silence the British pretext of not being able to restrain them. The address of gen. M’Clure is a sufficient comment on their conduct. We have a party now out, col. Chapin is with them. We look for news from them every moment.”
The 23d infantry and all the light artillery, have left Fort George and taken up their line of march for the eastward on Thursday last, col. W. Scott accompanied them; but we do not learn that gen. M. Porter has left Fort Niagara.
We learn that col. Grieve, with the 7th regiment of state artillery, is on his march for the frontier.

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-November 4, 1813.

 

Buffalo, October 19

Buffalo, October 19.

Extract of a letter to the Editor dated Fort George October 17.

“On the 11th inst. we marched out with a force of eleven hundred, inclusive of Indians, to see what had become of the gallant Vincent. But we found he had absconded precipitately, burning all the public property he could reach. From the best information, there can be no doubt but that the appearance of the militia, who were supposed by the enemy to amount to 5000 men, and the employment of the Indians struck terror to their souls and caused their retreat. We marched to the Twelve Mile Creek, and were pursuing the rear guard of the enemy, who were about two hundred strong at the Forty with baggage and sick. But the movements of Col. Scott, who gave us notice that he was about to quit this fort, compelled Gen. M’Clure very reluctantly to give up the pursuit. We took a circuit through the country to Chippewa and thence to this place. We have collected immense quantities of public stores-perhaps 1000 barrels of flour, 3 or 400 stand of arms, 500 hides, tailow, bread, hats, &c. The conduct of the Indians ought to silence the British pretext of not being able to restrain them. The address of Gen. M’Clure is a sufficient comment on their conduct. We have a party now out. Col. Chapin, is now out. We look for news from them every moment.”

The 231 infantry and all the light artillery, have left Fort George and taken up their line of march for the case, ward on Thursday last, Col. W. Scott accompanied them; but we do not learn that Gen. M. Porter has left Fort Niagara.

We learn that Col. Grieve, with the 7th regt. of state artillery, is on his march for the frontier.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 5, 1813.

10.15.2013

England is a "flagged nation"

England is a “flogged nation.”-Mr. W. Smith on a recent debate on the cruelty of military officers, in the British house of commons, stated, that John O’Brian, a private soldier, was, by the order of col. Orde, on the Halifax station, for a small offence; loaded with a heavy knapsack in hot weather and ordered o walk abut all day, allowing him no rest, and made to take his dinner at sundial, standing. He then deserted, but surrendered himself. For this he was tried & sentenced to a THOUSAND LASHES; but being recommended to mercy he received only 500 of them!!! The honorable member stated a variety of other cases which appeared before a court martial respecting officers and privates. In three years and a half, said he, ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-TWO THOUSAND LASHES had been inflicted on a body of only 400 men, exclusive of garrison and drumhead sentences. And yet such a cruel, wanton and wicked nation as England, is called the “bulwark of the religion we profess.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 15, 1813.

Friday, October 15, 1813

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1813.

 
We received the account of a Battle on Lake Ontario, between Com. Chauncey and Sir James Yeo, which appears in our Postcript, on Saturday last, and have ever since been anxiously expecting to receive the particulars; but we have been constantly disappointed. By yesterday’s mail no National Intelligencer was received, and the one of the 9th inst. which reached us on Wednesday, laments the disappointment experienced at Washington form the Buffalo express mail having brought neither letter nor paper. As another mail would arrive at Washington on Sunday, we fully expect the important detail to-day, which, when received, shall be immediately issued in an extra paper.

Under the War head, it will be seen that Malden and Detroit are ours without a blow. We are concerned to add, that the British sloop of war Pelican, has taken, after a gallant defence, our sloop of war Argus. We refer to our Postcript for particulars.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 15, 1813.

Militia of Vermont



Militia of Vermont.-A brigade of the Militia of this State being ordered on the frontiers by the Governor, marched under the command of Col. Davis, (the former commander, Gen. Fassett, having accepted a commission in the service of the U. States.) When arrived in camp, Gen. Fassett took the command from Col. Davis, who immediately retired home, and was followed, in the course of a few days, by the principal part of the soldiers.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

Loss of the Argus

Loss of the Argus.

The capture of the Argus by the Pelican, however to be regretted by the friends of the American Navy, will not, we trust, reflect any discredit on the gallant and unfortunate officer by whom she was commanded. The Pelican was a new vessel, built in 1812. And we understand, is second in force to but one brig in the English navy, the Reindeer. She carried 16 carronades and one pivot gun, of 32 lbs. and 2 long 18 pounders, total 408 pounds, or 204 at a broadside.-With this disparity of force, about 17 to 10 against the Argus, Captain Allen maintained the contest for three quarters of an hour, and then submitted to the destiny of war, and yielded to the greater physical strength of his antagonist.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

Battle on Lake Erie

Battle on Lake Erie.

Lieut. Magrath, who was on board the Lawrence frigate, writes to his friend thus.-The Lawrence suffered greatly in her hull and riging, and having about 30 killed and 60 wounded; Niagara, 5 killed and 30 wounded. The enemy suffered greatly, the Detroit having about 60 killed and wounded; Queen Charlotte, about the same; with all their rigging and spars cut to pieces, so that, had the least breeze sprung up, she would not have had a spar standing. During the action, the wind continued at a light breezed, and a smooth sea;-when I took command of the Detroit, I found every rope cut except the Iarboard fore brace; the Queen Charlotte in the same suffered much in their hulls and riging, and killed and wounded.

“The Detroit is a very fine ship, just from the stocks; a much larger vessel than either of ours, and built of the best materials; her quarters are grape proof, whereas ours would admit grape through both sides.

“Our prize money, they say, will amount to about one million dollars.”

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

 

British Prisoners

British Prisoners.

The Salem Register of Saturday last, states, That on Thursday, ten English prisoners were selected from the prisonship in that town, and sent to Ipswich Stone Jail, to be kept in close confinement, as hostages in part for the sixteen unfortunate Americans closely confined at Halifax; and that 100 English soldiers and seamen were to be detained in retaliation for certain American prisoners sent form Halifax to England.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

10.13.2013

Tennessee Army

TENNESSEE ARMY.

Nashville, October 13.
At the date of our last information, there were about 1500 infantry at Fayetteville.-Several companies of mounted infantry-perhaps 4 or 500 men, have returned home, some of them under the expectation they would not be received when they should arrive at head quarters-others went on; and we understand that the commanding General did not know whether he was authorized to receive them or not-in consequence of which they left camp and returned home.-Gen. Jackson has, however, reached head quarters, which will prevent any such unfortunate occurrences henceforth. Of the 1000 militia ordered for service, 700 had reached head quarters.
We can therefore, only count certainly on a force of about 2600 men from Western Tennessee. This, when joined by the troops of East Tennessee at least 2000, and 3000 from Georgia, already embodied and probably on the march, will make an effective force of between 7 and 8000, which we believe amply sufficient to chastise any force the Creek Indians can possibly raise.
It is uncertain when General Jackson will march.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-November 5, 1813.

 

Letter from Andrew Jackson to Rachel Jackson

Camp Coffee
October 13th. 1813


My Dear

            I reached this Camp on yesterday--Colo. Hays no doubt advised you of my sudden departure from Camp Blount, we marched thirty miles in Eight hours & 20 minutes--and I am happy to say; that the alarm was unfounded and I do believe that what is called the friendly creeks are spies--I am in good health & my arm mending fast--I shall write you fully before I leave this, which will be some days--with sincere affection I am yrs

                                                                                                                Andrew Jackson

Tell my sweet little Andrew that papa will soon be back--and say to all our friends that we are all well here-

10.12.2013

Chauncey's Late Cruise

From the Albany Argus of Oct. 12.      

CHAUNCEY’S LATE CRUISE.

Hand-bills were issued from this office on Friday evening and Saturday morning, containing the most authentic information we had received on the subject; since which the editor of the Argus has had the pleasure of conversing with one of the officers of the Pike, who has obligingly communicated the following interesting particulars.
On the 28th Sept. our squadron sailed from Fort George, in pursuit of the enemy, whom they descried next day in the direction of York, and immediately gave chase towards the head of the Lake, our squadron being to windward. About 1 P.M. the Pike, being the van ship, and outsailing the rest of the squadron, commenced an action with the enemy, at half gun-shot, and sustained his fire singly for 2 hours, before our other ships came up. The schr. Simcoe, the enemy’s stern vessel, struck her colours; but the commodore’s anxiety to pay his respects to Sir James, induced him to leave her for others of our squadron to take possession of, and she escaped. About 4 o’clock the enemy bore away and came to anchor near the shore, under the funs of Burlington heights. The Commodore apprehensive of getting aground, the wind blowing a gale directly on shore, deemed it not prudent to follow; he therefore beat up to Fort George, off which place he anchored on the morning of the 1st.
The Pike had 3 men killed and 19 wounded by the bursting of a 24 pounder, and 1 killed and 4 wounded by the fire of the enemy. But one shot passed through her hull, though several struck. The injury done to the enemy appeared to have been considerable. The Wolfe had her main and mizen-topmasts shot away, and the Royal George lost her fore-topmast. One of our schrs. Lost a mast in the gale.
On the 2d Oct. the squadron having repaired damages, and seen the army pass down our shore in about 300 boats, proceeded against in quest of the Knight of the Lake. He was described on the 4th, but lost sight of during the night. On the morning of the 5th, com. Chauncey, suspecting the enemy had gone down the Lake immediately [illegible] all sail for the False Ducks with an intention of cutting off his retreat to Kingston. At 2 P.M. 3 sail were described ahead; the Pike and Sylph immediately cast off the 2 schrs. they had in tow, and give chase, leaving the rest of the squadron under the command of Capt. Crane, of the Madison. On nearing the enemy there were discovered to be 7 sail, viz. 5 schooners, a sloop and gunboat. The schrs. were captured without resistance; the sloop was abandoned and set on fire by the enemy and the gun-boat run on shore.
Our squadron arrived at Sackett’s Harbour on Wednesday morning, with the five prize schooners, each carrying one gun, except the Growler, which carried 2, and having on board 259 men, of De Rottenberg’s regiment, maj. Grant, aid to De Rottenbergh, and 48 other prisoners, making a total of 308. The enemy’s schrs. were on their way from the head of the Lake to Kingston.

We trust that this news is only the precursor of more brilliant achievements upon the frontiers. 

 

Published in the Maryland Gazette-October 21, 1813.

From the Albany Argus

FROM THE ALBANY ARGUS.

Extract of a letter to a gentleman in Albany, dated Fort George, Oct. 12.
“The enemy have left the vicinity of Fort George; General M’Clure is closely pursuing them, with about 2,000 men-volunteers, militia and Indians. It is believed, he will pursue them at least to the Forty Mile Creek.”
The retreat of the enemy is confirmed by a letter from Colonel Scott, who adds, that he destroyed a part of his stores and arms, which he was not able to take off in his hurry.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 29, 1813.

Honorable William Jones

Honorable William Jones,
Secretary of the Navy, Washington.
__

From the Buffaloe Gazette of Oct. 12.
Dreadful Storm.-On Saturday night last, a most violent storm of wind, hail and rain commenced from the South West, and continued about 8 feet; and on Sunday evening the flats at the mouth of Buffaloe Creek, were nearly covered with water. The salt and other property which were lying near the margin of the lake, must have been considerably damaged.

Two companies of militia have been detached from Gen. Hopkins’ brigade, to the command of one of which Capt. Wm. Hull, of this village, has been assigned.

Major Chapin has recently been brevetted a Lieut. Col. In the service of the U.States.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 29, 1813.

 

 

 

10.09.2013

From a Halifax Paper of October 9

From a Halifax Paper of October 9.

Summary of News from Canada.
By an express from Quebec, letters have been received to the 30th ult-they are of a gloomy and extraordinary nature, and we should have considered them as the visions of our Canadian friends, had not accounts from the United States corroborated the capture of Capt. Barclay’s little squadron-all we can collect is that a fleet (if it can be called) badly armed, and badly manned encountered an enemy better provided in both respects, and much superior in size and numbers-that Gen. Proctor’s little army depended on impossibilities to wage offensive operations, and had to encounter famine in the event of being obligated to retreat. If this is really the case, why are we placed in this predicament? Had we not the means of bring as well prepared as the Americans? Certainly we had every superiority in that respect, & in every other-but we wisely forbore to make offensive war in Canada, lest our FRIENDS OF THE NORTHERN STATES SHOULD BE OFFENDED, and therefore make actual invasion in the Southern with a force inadequate to cause a division. We have no idea that the American army can ever conquer the Canadas; we only lament the distresses our sister colonies must encounter in carrying on a protracted warfare which might have been crush in the bud.

 
Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-December 17, 1813.

Malden & Detroit Ours!

MALDEN & DETROIT OURS!

Washington City Oct. 9.
Letters were this day received by the Secretary of War, from Gen. Harrison, dated Head-quarters, Malden, Sep. 27. The Gen. had that day landed about 3 miles below Malden, and took possession of the place about one hour afterwards. The enemy had evacuated the town, and previously destroyed every thing. 14 Indians were captured. Gen. H. intended pursuing the enemy the next day. They had retired to Sandwhich.
A letter from Col. Smith, at Sandusky, dated Oct. 2, received this morning by the express, states that Gen. Harrison was in pursuit of the enemy.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 15, 1813.

From Burlington, Oct. 9


From Burlington, Oct. 9.

“Col. Isaac Clarke, with a detachment of 130 men of the Rifle corps, has just returned from an expedition into Lower Canada. He embarked in batteaux at Chazy, and proceeded to Caldwell’s manor, where he surprised the garrison and took prisoners, Maj. Powell, and about 93 other officers and privates, 120 stand of arms, 8 horses, 7 oxen, and 3 or 4 thousand dollars worth of property, recently smuggled from the Status, consisting of leather shoes, &c.

“Brigadeer Gen. Izard, from New York, has joined Gen. Hampton, at [illegible].

"Some little skirmishing has taken place between the Indians and pick guards of Gen. Hampton’s army; in one of them, Lt. Nash, of the 33d was killed.

“Gov. Provost, it is said, has passed down into the Lower Province, escorted by 1000 men:-It is also said, that the mass of the militia, from 16 to 50, are called out.

“Several detachments have passed on to join the main army.

“Two large and very fine Row gallies, are building at Plattsburg, and will be ready for service in a few days.”

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 22, 1813.

10.08.2013

Friendaly Indians

FRIENDLY INDIANS.

A number of the Delaware and other Indians have collected with their families near Piqua (Ohio) under the protection of the United States, and the chiefs & many of the warriors of these tribes have joined the troops of the United States, under the command of Major General Harrison. So inflamed are the people of the Western Country at the barbarities of the Indians, committed at the instigation of Britain, that the Commander in Chief of the N.W. Army has apprised the Governor of Ohio that these friendly tribes who have joined our cause are in danger from the resentment of the people-and has requested of the Governor to exercise his authority to prevent those Indians from being sacrificed to false impressions & angry passions. Gen. Harrison says he is perfectly convinced of their fidelity to the United States-that many of their warriors are now with him rendering important services to the army; and that “to attempt indiscriminately to murder these people, would inflict a blot upon the national honor which would never be effaced.” Governor Meigs of Ohio has accordingly issued his proclamation, forewarning all the people of Ohio “against acts of indiscriminate revenge-that they take not justice into their own hands-and violate not the sanctity of treaties-nor disrespect the asylum established by the government.-But that a period so interesting to Ohio as the present, they would confide in the exertions of Major General Harrison, superintendant of Indian affairs, to examine into the past & guard against the future.” We hope the proclamation of Governor Meigs will have the desired effect, to allay the angry passions of the people, & to frustrate the machinations of the British, whose aim no doubt is to promote discord between the frontier inhabitants of Ohio and the neighboring Indians and in face to involve us in war with every Indian tribe.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 8, 1813.

 

A letter from Midshipman Magrath of the navy to his friends in Charleston

A Letter from Midshipman Magrath of the navy to his friend in Charleston, gives some particulars of the action on Lake Erie, which we have not before seen-He states that the enemy’s ship Detroit had about 60 killed and wounded-Queen Charlotte about the same, with all their rigging and spars cut to pieces. The smaller vessels of the enemy also suffered much in their hulls and rigging, and in killed and wounded. He states the force of the enemy to men at 630-ours at 550.

Another Naval Challenge.-We have before us a letter from one of the crew of the U.S. Brig Enterprize, which states, that she has received and accepted a challenge from H.B.M. brig Young Emulous. The Enterprize is repairing, and the battle to be fought in 30 days from receipt of the challenge, which was on the 18th ult. The crew of the Enterprize were complimented by the citizens of Portland with a public dinner on the 20th.

Demo. Press

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 8, 1813.

Battle on Lake Ontario

Battle on Lake Ontario.

ALBANY, OCT. 8.

“We learn by a passenger in the stage, that our troops from Fort George were off Oswego, in boats, on Wednesday-They probably reached the Harbour yesterday.

“From comparing all our information, we are led to believe, that Yeo, finding our troops embarked in boats, and that he could not molest them without fighting Chauncey, proceeded to the head of the Lake, and embarked the force there, in order to proceed to Kingston, to repel the meditated attack, and that on their way down the schooners were descried and captured by our fleet.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 15, 1813.

 

Military

MILITARY.

On Wednesday 4 regiments of the third division of Massachusetts Militia were reviewed at Waltham. The appearance of the troops was highly respectable, and the day being fine, the number of spectators was very great. We learn, with pain, that during the evolutions of the day, two men were severely wounded by the accidental explosion of an artillery magazine.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 8, 1813.

 

Commodore Perry


Commodore Perry, who at the time of the late brilliant action held the rank of Master and Commandor, is promoted to the rank of Captain in the navy.

 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 8, 1813.

From Lake Ontario

From Lake Ontario.

A gentleman arrived in town last evening from Sacket’s Harbor, which he left on the 1st inst. Com. Chauncey’s squadron remained in Niagara river, at the last dates, where it had been wind bound several days, with about 3000 troops on board from Fort George, leaving at Fort George about 1000 men. The troops at Sacket’s  Harbor (about 5000) were held in readiness for embarkation, and boats were preparing to receive them.


 

Published in the Boston Weekly Messenger-October 8, 1813.

 

10.07.2013

Another Battle Near Fort George

ANOTHER BATTLE NEAR FORT GEORGE.

Extract of a letter from Colonel C. Chapin, to his friend in this village, dated Fort George, Oct. 7, 1813.
“Yesterday morning I went out with 60 volunteers and 40 Indians-about two miles from the Fort we were fired upon by a small party of the enemy; we returned the fire and pursued them half a mile, when they were reinforced, and took shelter in a log house and barn; we soon routed them and drove them half a mile further into the woods and left them and returned to Fort George.-While at dinner, I received information of the British army being in the town of Newark. I immediately rallied a party of 100 men and commenced a fire upon them, who returned it with much warmth-we kept the ground till we were reinforced by 60 Indians and 100 militia.
“With this force, we compelled the enemy to retreat and pursued them one and a half miles, when we received a reinforcement of 100 men, with this force, we drove them a half mile further, where they covered themselves in a ravine and opened a most tremendous fire of musketry upon us. After an hour and a half hard fighting, we drove them from the ravine back to the batteries-it being now nearly dark, we returned in good order.
“From some deserters and a prisoner we took, we learn that we had contended with the whole British army, consisting of 1100 men, with the great Gen. Vincentat their head; and that we killed 32. Our loss was three killed and 8 wounded.
“The volunteers, militia and Indians behaved with great bravery.”
“Maj. Chapin has recently been brevetted a Lieut. Col. in the service of the U.States.”

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-October 29, 1813.

Letter from Andrew Jackson to John Coffee

Camp Blount. 
7th. Octr. 1813 9 Oclk at night


Sir

         I arrived at this place, this evening, about 4 OClk, in good health & beter spirits. It is surely high gratification to learn that the Creeks are so attentive to my situation, as to save me the pain of traveling. I must not be outdone in politeness, & will therefore endeavor to meet them on the middle ground.
         I lament that on my arrival here, I did not find either so many men as I had expected, or them so well equipped. This evil however I shall endeavor to remedy as speedily as practicable, and in a few days I hope to realize my wishes.
         I cannot believe that the Creeks have, at this time, any serious intention of an attack upon our frontiers; & yet I would not have you entirely disregard the information you have received. But whether they have such an intention or not, it seems to me that a rapid movement, into their own country, will be the most effectual means of discomfiting their measures. So soon as I can organise a force sufficient for the undertaking, & procure the necessary supplies, I shall certainly commence it. Your Cooperation will then be indispensably necessary; & for that reason I will you to occupy some eligible position in the quarter where you now are, until you receive further orders from me. In the mean time I wish you to receive, & to treat with great kindness all such spies from the Creek nation as may offer you any communication. Let them not be discharged until my arrival. We must have the truth; & whilst that shall be duly rewarded, false information must be severely punished.
           I shall move from this place to Ditto's landing, but when, I really have it not in my power to inform you. I agree with you however entirely that the sooner I can be there the better.
          By advises this moment received from Capt Strother (dated Lowry's 5th. Octr) it appears that the enemy are in force at three points--the lower of which is at the Hickory ground, where they have erected a fort; & that that portion of them destined against us amount to about 3000. The whole force at Hickory ground is stated to be 4000, which is their principal reliance. Having become tired of waiting our approach, it is said they have commenced moving up their country with an intention of attacking the Friendly towns, at Coweta.
        In order to make a distinction between our friends & our enemies it is arranged by Capt Strother with the Cherokees, that our friends shall wear white plumes in their hair, or Deer's tails.
        Altho the letter from Strother would seem to confirm the reports which you have received, yet it has not altered my opinion as the course to be pursued.
        Be good enough to send to me here, all such men as may apply to you to be received. I should prefer them as Infantry; but in some capacity or other I must have them. At any event let them come & see me.
        You will appoint Majr. Shaw adjutant of the mounted Riflemen

                                                                                         Andrew Jackson
                                                                                         Major Genl