6.30.2014

MD Newspaper Articles Castigating Madison Administration


June 30, 1814

Unattributed articles in Annapolis section of the Maryland Gazette:

“…In Calvert county absolute ruin has so suddenly overwhelmed its citizens,  that “like men without hope” they have become incurious to passing events; and in the torpor of despair can only sigh over their blasted prospects and ruined fortunes. Let us then, while we commiserate their sufferings, be warned by their calamities not to repose in a dangerous security; let us not rely on aid from the general government, for in that quarter the sources of hope are dried up; from thence we have received nothing but disappointment; but let us early and zealously cooperate, by our individual exertions in securing the best practicable system of defense within the compass of our means. In the state authorities we have the most unlimited confidence; we consider ourselves as peculiarly fortunate……We wish not to awaken groundless apprehensions, but we would as faithful centinels, rouse you from your slumbers before the enemy enters the citadel.”
“The people bordering on the Patuxent have a long account to settle with Mr. Madison. A retaliatory system of plunder and conflagration, long since predicted, has laid their dwellings in ashes, has driven them from their homes, and has almost rendered them beggars and outcasts. In vain will the minions of administration attempt to convince the people of Calvert and St. Mary’s counties that their indignation should be directed exclusively to the enemy….”

Newspaper Report. of 2nd Battle of St. Leonard's Creek


June 30, 1814

Two Maryland Gazette articles from Annapolis Maryland:

Flotilla

On Sunday last, the British blockading Barney’s squadron in St. Leonard’s Creek, were attacked by a detachment under the command of Col. Wadsworth, (who had previously thrown up a battery and fortified it with two eighteen pounders) with hot shot, and the flotilla under Barney, and driven from their moorings – Barney succeeded in getting out of the creek, and went up the Patuxent, with the loss of three killed and eight wounded – among the former a midshipman. By a gentleman, who landed at this place on Monday, and who was on board the frigate during the engagement, we learn that the only loss sustained by the enemy was one man wounded. Several shot from the flotilla holed her. The engagement continued one hour.
__________________________
On Sunday night a British barge with four men, supposed to belong to the Jasseur brig, lying at Plumb Point, about thirty miles below this place, captured several craft near Poplar Island, among them, we learn, one of the regular packets between this city and Haddaway’s Ferry. It is apprehended more mischief may have been done than we have yet heard, as there is no doubt there were other barges in the neighborhood of the Island.

6.29.2014

From the Correspondent of the Columbian

FROM THE CORRESPONDENT OF THE Columbian.

Camp, Dead Creek, near Plattsburg, June 29, 1814.
I have but little news to give you-little as it is you shall have it. Ones part of our army is stationed at or near Champlain, under the command of Brigadier General Smith. Our riflemen are in advance, within one mile of the lines: They have frequent skirmishes with the enemy.  The first attack that was made, the enemy attempted to cut off Lieut. Col. Forsythe, whose force consisted only of about 70 men; that of the enemy of about 200 regulars and Indians. The enemy were driven back with considerable loss; ours was two killed and five or six wounded. In this attack one whole platoon fired at Forsyth while sitting on his horse-but missed him. The day before yesterday they had another skirmish with the enemy, and, painful to relate, Lieut. Col. Forsythe was killed. I have not heard the particulars. The enemy are in considerable force between Oldetown and St. Johns. They have fortified the Stone Mill very strong.
I think we shall see a little fighting this campaign. There is a probability of the enemy’s coming out to see us. Our fleet has done nothing. We have command of the Lake. It is said the British have added fourteen more gallies to their force by bringing them across from St. Lawrence. This, if true, will make the lake pretty warm this summer.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-July 15, 1814.

6.28.2014

Sec. Jones Orders Barney to Washington for Meeting


June 28, 1814

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY JONES TO CAPTAIN JOSHUA BARNEY, FLOTILLA SERVICE

Joshua Barney Esq. Navy Department
Commanding the US flotilla Benedict June 28th 1814.

Sir
Last Evening I received yours of the 26th & 27th and congratulate you on the successful result of the vigorous effort by which the Blockade of St. Leonard's Creek was raised.

The Patuxent affording a safe retreat for the flotilla in the event of the blockade of that river being continued with such a force as to forbid the hope of your release, it has become necessary to consider and determine what is best to be done, and as this can be decided with a more full and satisfactory discussion by an hour’s conversation than by partial correspondence; I think, after you have made such arrangements and given such instructions to the officer next in command, as shall ensure the safety of the flotilla, and place you at ease during your absence for a day or two, you had better proceed immediately to this place, and with this view, I shall defer until your arrival whatever else I have at present to say.

I am respectfully your Obedt. Servant

W. Jones

Creek Indians

CREEK INDIANS.

Nashville, Tenn. June 28.
A Mr. Overton of Maury County, who has been detained for some time, contrary to his inclination, on board the British fleet, has returned home, having been landed from the vessel he was detained in at Pensacola. He states that there were at Pensacola when he left there about 1000 Indians, encamped on the bay opposite to the town.-That they were well armed, and had received their arms form the British, that about 17,000 stand of arm have been brought there by the British, and 800 British Soldiers had landed. From the known respectability of Mr. Overton, and his immediate knowledge of what he states, we are warranted in believing his statement to be correct.- Mr. Overton states that the inhabitants on the Tombigbee were under serious apprehensions of an immediate attack and that the above information had been sent to the President of the U.S., by the way of Georgia.
Fears are entertained that the arms above mentioned are for arming the Indians and the Black of the Southern section of the union; Conjectures are afloat that Florida is part of the identification that England exacts for her sacrifices of blood and treasure in Spain, and that very serious apprehensions may be felt for the safety of Orleans.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-July 22, 1814.

6.27.2014

Report to Adm. Cockburn on 2nd Battle of St. Leonards Creek


June 27, 1814
CAPTAIN THOMAS BROWN, R.N. TO REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE COCKBURN, R.N.

His Majesty’s Ship Loire Off Point Patience in the Patuxent 27 June 1814

Sir
I beg to acquaint you that yesterday at daylight the Enemy opened a Battery of Five Guns on the two Ships under my Command, from the high land, forming the Entrance of Leonard’s Creek, on the Larboard hand, at point blank Shot, it being covered with Wood, we were only enabled to fire at where the smoke issued from, shortly after the Flotilla came down rounded the point and opened a well directed fire on both Ships, but from the warm reception they met with, were soon obliged to retreat. 

I had previously to this sent the Launches of the Ships, with a boat fitted for Rockets to flank the battery, when I soon had the satisfaction to observe a slight explosion to take place, and the Battery to cease firing but judging we might be harassed by the Battery again opening on us and the Ships having been frequently hulled, and part of the Rigging Shot away, I thought it most prudent to weigh and drop down the River to a place called Point Patience, where I again Anchored about three Miles below in hopes the Flotilla might be induced to follow, but on its falling calm had the mortification to observe them rowing down the Creek, and up the River, the whole consisting of One Sloop and Eighteen Row Boats.

One of them we observed, to be obliged to return to the Creek, which I imagine had sustained so much injury as to prevent her accompanying the rest, during the firing which continued nearly two hours; I am happy to say the only person wounded is the Boatswain of the Narcissus who has lost a leg.

Captain Lumley who is the bearer of this will be able to give you any further information you may deem necessary, and whose cordial cooperation during the time we have been together merits my warmest approbation.

I have the honor to remain Sir your most Obedient Servant

Thos. Brown Capt.

British Report on 2nd Battle to Adm. Cockburn

June 27, 1814
CAPTAIN THOMAS BROWN, R.N. TO REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE COCKBURN, R.N.

His Majesty’s Ship Loire Off Point Patience in the Patuxent 27 June 1814

Sir
I beg to acquaint you that yesterday at daylight the Enemy opened a Battery of Five Guns on the two Ships under my Command, from the high land, forming the Entrance of Leonard’s Creek, on the Larboard hand, at point blank Shot, it being covered with Wood, we were only enabled to fire at where the smoke issued from, shortly after the Flotilla came down rounded the point and opened a well directed fire on both Ships, but from the warm reception they met with, were soon obliged to retreat. 

I had previously to this sent the Launches of the Ships, with a boat fitted for Rockets to flank the battery, when I soon had the satisfaction to observe a slight explosion to take place, and the Battery to cease firing but judging we might be harassed by the Battery again opening on us and the Ships having been frequently hulled, and part of the Rigging Shot away, I thought it most prudent to weigh and drop down the River to a place called Point Patience, where I again Anchored about three Miles below in hopes the Flotilla might be induced to follow, but on its falling calm had the mortification to observe them rowing down the Creek, and up the River, the whole consisting of One Sloop and Eighteen Row Boats.

One of them we observed, to be obliged to return to the Creek, which I imagine had sustained so much injury as to prevent her accompanying the rest, during the firing which continued nearly two hours; I am happy to say the only person wounded is the Boatswain of the Narcissus who has lost a leg.

Captain Lumley who is the bearer of this will be able to give you any further information you may deem necessary, and whose cordial cooperation during the time we have been together merits my warmest approbation.

I have the honor to remain Sir your most Obedient Servant

Thos. Brown Capt.

Account of Second Battle of St. Leonard's Creek

June 27, 1814
Second Battle of St. Leonard’s Creek
Captain Joshua Barney, Flotilla Service, to (brother) Louis Barney

Flotilla off Benidick, June 27th. 1814
Dr. Louis,
Yesterday morning at the point of day we woke up our enemies, by 2 pieces. (18 pounders) under Capt Geoghegan his officers & 20 men of the flotilla , with red hot shot, 3 pr. under Capt Miller of the Marines, the Artillery posted on a Hill commanding the Enemy, the whole under Col. Wadsworth,   the enemy were so alarmed that it was a quarter of an hour before they returned a shot—   I moved down with the flotilla, and joined in "Chorus," our shot was terrible, as we were not more than four hundred yards off, a distance which did not suit us, for we were within grape shot, but I was obliged to take that or none, as they lay direct in the mouth of the Creek, we pushed out and gave it to them, the moment we appeared they ceased their fire on the Batteries and poured it into us, seeming to have just waked, we returned it with Interest, at 6 they began to move and made sail down the river leaving us Masters of the field, thus we have again beat them & their Rockets, which they did not spare, you see we improve, first, we beat a few boats which they thought would make an easy prey of us, then they increased the number, then they added schooners, and now behold the [two] frigates, all, all, have shared the same fate,   I next expect, ships of the line; no matter we will do our duty—   My loss was 6 Killed & four wounded, young Asquith who had just joined us was killed—Captn. Sellers, Kiddall, & Worthington’s boats were the sufferers,   I had three men wounded at the fort, for it was my men alone that fought there, altho there was 600 men of Carbery & Littles Regmt. in the rear—   I am now waiting orders from headquarters.
Give my love to Ann & Kiss Misses—
Your Afft.          J Barney
Wm. (son) was not with us, as I had sent him with Skinner, in a flag to the Admiral with dispatches from Government—
The moment the enemy ran off, we moved up the River, so that, thanks to Hot & cold shot the Blockade has been raised—

Letter to John Armstrong from Andrew Jackson

Head Quarters 7th. M: District Murfreesborough
June 27th. 1814

Sir.

        Mine of the 25th. instant advised of the rumours of the day and that one the 26th. I would set out for Fort Jackson--At this place I met a corroboration of the account that 300 British had landed and are fortifying at the mouth of the Apalachacola, and are arming and exciting the Indians to acts of hostility against the United States--Whether these rumours are founded in fact, or not, we ought at least to be prepared for the worst--
      Query--If the Hostile Creeks have taken refuge in East Florida, fed and armed there by the Spaniards and British; the letter having landed troops within it and fortifying, with a large supply of munitions of war and provisions, and exciting the Indians to hostilities--Will the government say to me, require a few hundred Militia (which can be had for the campaign at one days notice) and with such of my disposable force in regulars proceed to---------and reduce it--If so I promise the war in the south has a speedy termination and British influence forever cut off from the Indians in that quarter--John Read Esqr. of Franklin Tennessee late Lieutenant in the volunteers authorised by the acts of February and July 1812--has served me in the capacity of Aid-de-camp--during the whole Creek war. Can I hope that he will be commissioned in the army of the United States, that I may have an opportunity of continuing him in that capacity--he is the gentleman alluded to in mine of the 25th. as Secretary, and would make a good Captain--
         Captain W O Butler of the 44th. Infy. has made it known to me that he is without a
   1st. Lieutenant, and that probably they have not been all appointed--
         I take the liberty to recommend Richard S. Call late Lieutenant in General Roberts Brigade which retrograded, yet he remained firmly at his post, joined the Artillery company as a volunteer and fought nobly at enotochopco--he is brave, and will make a good officer--I have the honor to be very respectfully Your Mo. Obt. St.

                                                                                                        Andrew Jackson
                                                                                                        Major Genl Comdg

I break the seal to give Russleville Kentucky as the address of Lt. Call.

6.26.2014

Initial Report on 2nd Battle From Barney to Sec. Jones

June 26, 1814
CAPTAIN JOSHUA BARNEY, FLOTILLA SERVICE TO SECRETARY OF THE NAVY JONES
Honorable Wm. Jones Sunday 26 June 1814 10 AM 

Sir
This morning at 4 AM a combined Attack of the Artillery, Marine Corps, & flotilla, was made upon the Enemies two frigates at the mouth of the Creek, after two hours engagement, they got under way & made sail down the river, they are now warping round Point Patience, and I am moving up the Patuxent with the flotilla, my loss is Acting Midshipman Asquith Killed & ten others killed & wounded— Mr. Blake the bearer of this was a Volunteer in my barge, he will give you every other Information 

With respect your Obt. Servant

Joshua Barney

6.25.2014

Cockburn's Public Report on Actions on the Patuxent and Situation of the Flotilla

June 25 1814
This is the second letter this date from Admiral Cockburn to Admiral Cochrane- this one was a “public” letter while the other letter this date was a “private” letter.  Note the term “Colonial Marines” refers to the black recruits from freed slaves.

REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE COCKBURN, R.N., TO VICE ADMIRAL SIR ALEXANDER F. I. COCHRANE, R.N.
No. 19 Albion in the Chesapeake
the 25th. June 1814

Sir,
I have the Honor to report to you that in pursuance of the System which I stated to you … I had thought most advisable to pursue here, for distracting and annoying the Enemy's Attention, Means, and resources; I caused (soon after the sailing of the Lacedemonian) some Excursions to be made up the Severn, York, and Back Rivers, which however were not attended with any Consequences beyond that of harassing the Enemy and therefore do not require being further detailed to you.

On the 28th May having learnt that the Enemy had erected a Battery and established a Post at a Place called Pungoteake not far from this Anchorage, I determined on attempting to Surprise the Guard and destroy the Work, On which Service therefore the Boats of the Albion and Dragon, proceeded in the Night of the 28th under the immediate Command of Captain Ross of this Ship who very handsomely volunteered his Services on the occasion, and I have much Pleasure in adding that tho' they failed in the first part of the object (owing to the Wind and Sea getting up and preventing their reaching the place before daylight) yet they completely succeeded in the latter Point bringing off with them a very handsome 6 Pounder Field Piece after destroying the Battery Guard House etc. etc. in the Face of the whole Militia Force of the Neighbourhood; herewith I transmit for your more particular Information the official Report of this Gallant little affair, and have much Pleasure in congratulating you on the Conduct of our new raised Corps, the Colonial Marines, who were for the first time, employed in Arms against their old Masters on this occasion, and behaved to the admiration of every Body.

On the 30th May I was on the point of sending off an Expedition of similar Nature against a place called Cherrystone further to the Southward, under the immediate Direction of Captain Barrie, when I received Intelligence by one of these Islanders that a more extensive and formidable Flotilla than that of last Year had again been fitted out from Baltimore at great expense, and had actually sailed from thence under the Command of Commodore Barney towards the Potowmac, and was supposed in the first Instance to be intended to Capture or destroy any of our smaller detached Vessels which they might be able to cut off and surprise, and then to join in the Potowmac River, the Washington and Norfolk Flotillas both of which were on the move though they had not as yet quitted those places.

 Having often received Communications of this Nature without foundation, I did not give implicit faith to the Intelligence but I considered it sufficiently worthy of Attention to induce me to change the destination of my little Expedition and in lieu thereof, to direct Captain Barrie to proceed with the Boats of this Ship and Dragon and the St. Lawrence (covering them with the Dragon) as high up the Chesapeake as the Patuxent, looking into every Creek and inlet in the way, to ascertain whether such a Flotilla was in the Neighbourhood, and if so, to use his utmost endeavors with the means at his disposal  to Capture or destroy it; on the 3rd I learnt by Letter from Captain Barrie that he had scarcely reached St. Jerome's Creek in the furtherance of the Instructions I had given him, when he discovered the Flotilla in question consisting of Twenty four Vessels large and small, standing with a fair Wind towards Hoopers Straits, near to which the Jaseur had been placed to cover a Party of our People getting fascines from the Upper Islands for Fort Albion— on seeing the St. Lawrence and our Boats the Flotilla altered its Course and gave Chase to them but on discovering the Dragon under Sail it made the best of its way back up the Chesapeake again, and was closely pursued by the St. Lawrence the Boats and the Dragon, 'till it reached the Patuxent in which River it took shelter; Captain Barrie there closed with it, and reconnoitered it, and found the Strength of the Flotilla was far too great for him to attempt doing anything against with the force then attached to him as there was not working room for a Line of Battle Ship within the River but he stated that he thought the Enemy might be followed up the Patuxent and perhaps something done with them if I would send to him Frigates and other small Craft. I therefore immediately dispatched an order to Lynhaven Bay for the Loire to proceed without Loss of Time to the Patuxent and I recalled the Jaseur from the Service she was engaged in at the upper part of this Inlet, and ordered her likewise to join him without delay, this was (unfortunately) all the force under my orders excepting only the Acasta in Lynhaven Bay and this Ship here between which I endeavored to keep up a Communication though fifty miles apart, by means of a Prize Sloop I converted into a Tender.

…… and as I had learnt by Letter from Captain Barrie that notwithstanding everything I had sent to the Patuxent, it was perfectly impracticable for him to do anything successful against the Flotilla in the Situation it had occupied in Leonard's Creek, that all his Efforts by burning Stores etc. in the Neighbourhood had failed of inducing Commodore Barney to come from his strong hold, and that a very large land Force had been gathered from all parts for the Security of this Flotilla, I was obliged to give up the Idea of destroying it for the present, but I could not bring myself to permit of its escaping again from a Place where it is so easily to be got at, if any Strength of Marines or Land Force (as now expected) should arrive, and where by its being kept, the whole Country around Baltimore which was at the great expense of fitting it out, is left open to our incursions, … 'till the 22nd when Captain Barrie informed me that he conceived the great Force and active Power of this Baltimore Flotilla to be such as to render it decidedly an overmatch for any of our smaller Ships and therefore that he had been obliged to leave the Loire, Narcissus and St. Laurence at the mouth of the Creek to obey the part of my order which directed its retention within the River, no smaller force than that being in his opinion adequate to such service.

……the wariness of Commodore Barney has prevented the great object I had in view (the Destruction of this new raised Flotilla) yet my general Plan of annoying and distressing the Enemy to the utmost in all his different accessible Points, has been forwarded in a most eminent Degree by the indefatigable efforts of Captain Barrie and the Force under him to oblige the Flotilla to come forth for the Protection of the Country, which, with this View was overrun by our Marines and Sailors in every Direction on both sides the River to within Eighteen Miles of Washington itself, vast stores of Tobacco which had been hoarded in the upper Part of the River (from the supposed security of the Situation) have been set fire to and destroyed to the Value of at least 7 or 800,000 Dollars; as well as all the Guard Houses and others where Military Posts had been established, and all the towns near the Banks have been abandoned, and Consternation spread far and near, and above Four hundred Hogsheads of Tobacco shipped off from the wharves and embarked in the Frigates.

In short Sir I am sure I am within the Mark when I state to you that since my last Communication of the 9th May we have taken or destroyed within the Chesapeake above a Million of Dollars worth of the Enemy's Vessels and Property. The above mentioned Movements and unexpected accumulation of Force of the Enemy, although I have managed in some degree to cause it to recoil on himself has nevertheless occasioned me much anxiety and difficulty…

…I have now only to add that learning yesterday Evening the Enemy had established another Post and Battery at a place called Chissinessick immediately abreast of Watts' Island I determined on destroying it, which was ably and gallantry accomplished by the Boats of this Ship the Dragon, and Endymion under the Command of Lieutenant Urmston 1st. Lieutenant of this Ship, who brought off with them another Six Pounder Field Piece after destroying the Work and burning the Guard Houses &c. &c. in its Vicinity ……this is the third Battery taken and Second Gun brought off from the Enemy by the Boats since my last report. I also
enclose herewith a List of Vessels captured and destroyed since my Last.

 I have the Honor to be Sir your very faithful And Most Obedient Humble Servant

G Cockburn Rear Admiral

Cockburn's Private Report to Adm. Cochrane on the Chesapeak and the Flotilla's Situation

June 25, 1814
(Note that Admiral Cockburn’s uses slang “Jonathan” to refer to Americans)
REAR ADMIRAL GEORGE COCKBURN, R.N., TO VICE ADMIRAL SIR ALEXANDER F. I. COCHRANE, R.N.
Albion in Tangier Bay 25 June 1814

My dear Sir
My public Letters will inform you of all our late Operations and how sharply and unexpectedly Jonathan has exerted himself in putting forth his Marine Armaments in this Bay and how much I have been puzzled to cut & contrive to meet him at all Points and cause all his Efforts to recoil on himself, I trust My dear Sir you will be satisfied with our Exertions, and can truly assure you that every man has done his best, had I had more force at my disposal more should have been done but as it is, this last Month has cost the Enemy around us more than a Million of Dollars, and I have his great Armament fast where it can do no harm but to its Friends and is exposed to certain Destruction whenever force enough arrives to attack it.

Captain Barrie will probably have to deliver to you my Dispatches indeed I hope it may so happen as he can give you every particular respecting the Situation of the Flotilla & of the Force requisite or best adapted for destroying it— the Bombs Ships are in my Opinion the first & principal requisite, the Marines the next; I like the description of Force you now have with you far better than that which was here last year, it is of a much handier & less ceremonious kind. I hope you will be induced to push up towards the Patuxent or their Islands without stopping in Lynhaven, that the Armament may arrive before the Accounts of it.

I am decidedly of Opinion that about the Seat of Government & in the upper parts of the Chesapeak is where your Operations may be commenced to most Effect—but the Country is in general in a horrible State it only requires a little firm & Steady Conduct to have it completely at our Mercy.

I beg you to weigh in your Mind the reasoning in my last Letter to Coll. Barclay, and to make up your Mind how you choose us to act on the subject of their Militia Men, much will turn on this.

I hope you will be gratified at learning by my public Letters how uncommonly and unexpectedly well the Blacks have behaved in the several Engagements in which they have now joined with us, & though one of them was shot & died instantly in the front of the others at Pungoteake it did not daunt or check the others in the least but on the contrary animated them to seek revenge. Mr. Hammond however has them in excellent order & entirely prevents their committing any improper outrages, he really deserves much Credit for his Care & Management of these People, & I trust you will be inclined to do something for him.  I do not think we want recruiting Parties from the West India Regiments, as I much prefer your Idea of forming a Corps of Colonial Marines the Name by which they are now known and I assure you I should be most happy to have a Proportion of them embarked in the Albion in lieu of our own Marines, they are stronger Men and more trust worthy for we are sure they will not desert whereas I am sorry to say we have Many Instances of our Marines walking over to the Enemy.
……..
Dragon is loaded literally with Prize goods & I have still, more here than I know what to do with, I hope you will have some Transports with you fit to take it in, you see we have not been quite Idle even in this way—…
…I enclose herewith some of our latest Papers and in anxious hope of soon seeing you the Bomb Ships 8c Marines— 

I remain my dear Sir Most faithfully & truly your's

G: Cockburn

6.24.2014

Newspaper Complaints about Flotilla Presence on Patuxent

24 June 1814
Federal Republican Newspaper

Excerpt from newspaper article complaining about the Chesapeake flotilla:

“…We were informed by our Lord High Admiral (Joshua Barney), was fully adequate to the protection ….of the Patuxent. Now the citizens inhabiting the shores….are called upon to protect the flotilla…would it not be prudence as well as economy to set fire to the pigmy fleet at once, and thus relieve the citizens from a duty which is peculiarly irksome to them, as they must by this time be convinced, that the boats, to guard which they are called upon to expose their lives, are worse than useless as means of maritime defence. If the voluntary destruction of the naval mockery were left to the decision of the people on the Patuxent the bonfire would not remain long unkindled, and there are few men in the county who would now feel a moment’s regret at beholding every vestige of the Jeffersonian navy committed to the flames. The history of gun boats is the history of disaster and disgrace, in which not one item of usefulness or glory can be found and the sooner the last chapter is written, the better nine- tenths of our countrymen will be pleased.”

6.23.2014

Portsmouth, N.H. June 23

Portsmouth, N.H. June 23.

Draughted Militia disbanded.-We learn from Concord that the Legislature, by a very large majority, have come to a resolution to disband the militia which have been called out for the defence of this town and harbor. This measure we learn, is taken in consequence of the following letter to the Governor from the Secretary of War, by which it would seem that the General Government does not approve of calling out the militia in this case, and of course if they are continued the United States will not pay the expense.

 

Published in the Raleigh Register and North Carolina Gazette-July 15, 1814.

 

6.22.2014

Adm. Cockburn's Summary of Early Actions Against the Flotilla

June 22, 1814
Admiral Cockburn forwards a group of letters reporting activity against the flotilla fitted out at Baltimore, under the orders of Commodore Barney.

“On the 1st of June, Capt. Barrie….fell in with the flotilla standing down the Chesapeake, and retreated before it towards the Dragon, then at anchor off Smith’s Point. This ship having got under weigh, Capt. Barrie wore with the schooner and boats, but the flotilla made off and escaped into the Patuxent River. The Dragon being obliged to come again to an anchor, and the boats not being strong enough to attack the flotilla, Capt. Barrie endeavored to induce the Enemy to separate his force by detaching two boats to cut off a schooner under Cove Point: but the Americans suffered this vessel to be burnt in the face of the flotilla, without attempting to save her.”

“On the 5th the flotilla retreated higher up the Patuxent, and Captain Barrie being joined on the following day by the Loire and Jaseur brig, he proceed up the river…The Enemy retreated into St. Leonard’s Creek, into which they could only be pursued by the boats, which were too inferior in force to allow of any attack being made by them alone; Captain Barrie endeavored, however, to provoke the Enemy by rockets and carronades from the boats, to come down within reach of the ship’s guns. The flotilla was at one time so much galled by these attacks, that it quitted its position, and chased the boats, and after a slight skirmish with the smaller vessels, it returned precipitately to its original position. With a view to force the flotilla to quit this station, detachments of seamen and marines were landed on both sides of the river, and the Enemy’s militia( though assembled to the numbers of three to five hundred), retreating before them into the woods, the marines destroyed two tobacco stores, and the several houses which formed military posts. On the 15th the Narcissus joined and Captain Barrie determined to proceed up the river with twelve boats, having in them one hundred and eighty marines, and thirty of the black colonial corps; they proceeded to Benedict, whence a party of regulars fled at their approach, leaving behind several muskets, and part of their camp equipage with a six pounder, which was spiked; a store of tobacco was also found there. Captain Barrie advanced from thence toward Marlborough, and although only eighteen miles from Washington, took possession of the place, the militia and inhabitants flying in the wood. A schooner was loaded with tobacco, and the boats plentifully supplied with stock; after which, having burnt tobacco stores containing two thousand five hundred hogsheads, the detachment re-embarked. Captain Barrie commends, in high terms, the conduct of all the officers and men, seamen and marines….as well as that of the Colonia corps, composed of armed blacks….”